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Full text of "A Kentucky woman's handy cook book"

Mutt< 
Corne 
Ham, 
Turke 
Chick 



Codfis 
Halib 
Bass, 
Salmc 
Lobst 



Potat< 
Onion 




Class - 



Book. 



A 



Copyright^?. 



COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT 



.30 to 
.15 to 



low 

oiling), 



.30 to 
.15 to 
.30 to 
.20 to 
es. 1 to 



Time 
15 min. 
20 min. 
20 min. 
50 min. 
40 min. 
20 min. 
40 min. 
20 min. 
20 min. 

3 hours 
20 min. 
20 min. 
40 min. 
20 min. 
60 min. 
30 min. 
2 hours 



BAKING. 



MEATS. 



Beef, rare, per lb. 8 to 10 min. 
Beef, well done, per lb, 

12 to 15 min. 
Round of beef, per lb, 

12 to 15 min. 
Mutton, leg, rare, per lb., 

10 min. 

Mutton, leg, well done, per lb., 
15 min. 

Lamb, well done, per lb., 

15 min. 

Veal, well done, per lb., 

18 to 20 min. 



Pork, well done, per lb., 

20 min. 

Venison, rare, per lb. .10 min. 

Chicken, per lb 15 min. 

Goose, per lb 20 min. 

Fillet, hot oven 30 min. 

Turkey, 9 lbs 2 hours 

Turkey, large 3 hours 

Birds, hot oven 20 min. 

Ducks, hot oven 45 min. 

Ducks, wild, very hot oven, 

20 min. 

Quail 30 to 40 min. 

Large Fish 50 to 60 min. 

Small Fish 30 min. 



Bread 1 hour. Cake 20 to 60 min. 

Biscuits 20 min. Custards (slow oven) . .1 hour. 

BROILING. 

Steak, \yi inch thick, Trout 20 to 25 min. 

8 to 10 min. Squabs 15 to 20 min. 

Mutton Chops 10 min. Quail 10 to 12 min. 

Spring Chicken 20 min. Small Fish 10 min. 

Shad 20 to 25 min. 

FRYING. 

Bacon 3 to 5 min. Fritters 3 to 5 min. 

Breaded Chops. . . .5 to 6 min. Fish Balls 1 min. 

Smelts 2 min. Croquettes 1 min. 

Slices of Fish. ..... 5 to 6 min. 



V 



A KENTUCKY WOMAN'S 
HANDY COOK BOOK 



By 

JESSIE HENDERSON COLVILLE 

M 




Printed for the Author 
by 

JENNINGS AND GRAHAM 



Copyright, 1912, by 
Jessie Henderson Colville. 



©CU328555 

4u>/ 



TO THE 
FRIENDS OF MY KITCHEN, 
WHO HAVE HELPED TO MAKE IT, 
I DEDICATE 
THIS LITTLE BOOK. 



Preface. 



At the request of encouraging friends, I offer to the 
public this little book of tried and proven recipes. 
In it are included recipes handed down to me by 
several generations and many given me by good 
friends. I am deeply indebted to Miss Jennie Bene- 
dict, of Louisville, Kentucky, and Mrs. W. A. John- 
son, of Paris, Kentucky, for a few valuable recipes 
from their published cook books. It is my earnest 
wish that all may find something of real value con- 
tained in the following pages that will prove very 
helpful in the every day routine. 

Jessie Henderson Colville. 



Index. 



Page. 



Time Table 2 

BREAD. 

Bread 13 

Plain Rolls 13 

Potato Rolls 14 

Beaten Biscuit 14 

Baking Powder Biscuit. ... 14 

Soda Biscuit 14 

Spoon Bread 15 

Batter Bread 15 

Waffles 15 

Milk Toast 16 

Boston Brown Bread 16 

Popovers 16 

Sally Lunn 16 

Rice Waffles 17 

Buckwheat Cakes 17 

Graham Bread 17 

Nut Bread 18 

Corn Muffins 18 

Corn Dodgers 18 

Cinnamon Buns 18 

Cinnamon Cake 19 

SOUPS. 

Clear Soup Stock 23 

Brown Soup Stock 24 

Black Bean Soup 24 

Vegetable Soup Stock 25 

Quick Bouillon 25 

Chicken Gumbo 26 

Bisque of Oysters 26 

Tomato Puree 27 

Mock Turtle Soup 27 

Ox Tail Soup 28 

Tomato Bisque 28 

Fresh Mushroom Soup. ... 29 

Cream of Chestnut Soup . . 29 

Cream of Spinach 29 

Cream of Asparagus 30 



Page. 

SOUP GARNISHINGS. 



Noodles 33 

Croutons 33 

Meat Balls for Soup 33 

FISH, LOBSTER, SHELL- 
FISH. 

To Plank a Fish 35 

Fish Chops 36 

Codfish Balls, No. 1 36 

Codfish Balls, No. 2 36 

Fried Halibut 37 

Creamed White Fish 37 

Scalloped Lobster 38 

Lobster a la Newburg 38 

Salmon Loaf 38 

Oysters Pendennis 39 

Oyster Filling for Patties. . 39 

Shad Roe 39 

Oysters for Late Supper. . . 40 

Scalloped Oysters 40 

Fried Oysters 40 

MEATS. 

Beef a la Mode 43 

Roast Beef 43 

Yorkshire Pudding 44 

Roast Spring Lamb 44 

Roast Leg of Mutton 44 

Mutton Chops 44 

Mutton Chops en Casse- 
role 44 

Mock Duck 45 

Mock Terrapin 45 

Roast Pork 46 

Breaded Pork Chops 46 

Curried Meat 46 

Boiled Ham, No. 1 46 

Boiled Ham, No. 2 47 

Roast Veal 47 

How to Cook Veal Cutlets . 47 



10 



INDEX. 



Page. 

How to Prepare Sweet- 



breads 48 

Fried Sweetbreads 48 

Creamed Sweetbreads 48 

To Cook a Fillet of Beef. . 49 

VEGETABLES. 

Southern Rice 51 

Rissotto 51 

Stuffed Green Peppers .... 52 

Spaghetti 52 

Stewed Tomatoes 52 

Panned Tomatoes 53 

Stuffed Tomatoes 53 

Stuffed Egg Plant . 53 

Cauliflower au Gratin 54 

Stuffed Irish Potatoes 54 

Potatoes a la Simpson .... 54 
Potatoes au Gratin 

O'Brien 54 

Dixie Potatoes 55 

Spinach 55 

Fresh Peas 55 

Corn Pudding 56 

Boston Baked Beans 56 

Scotch Haggis 56 

Fried Mush 57 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Chicken en Casserole 59 

Chicken Croquettes 59 

Creme de Volaille 60 

Anchovy Toast 60 

Chicken a. la King 60 

Beef Loaf 61 

Veal Loaf 61 

Jellied Veal 61 

Cheese Souffle 62 

SAUCES. 

Plain Cream Sauce 65 

Drawn Butter Sauce 65 

Fresh Mushroom Sauce ... 66 

Canned Mushroom Sauce. . 66 

Tomato Sauce, No. 1 66 

Tomato Sauce, No. 2 67 

Sauce for Sweetbreads or 

Chicken 67 

Sauce Hollandaise 67 



Page. 



Hollandaise Sauce 68 

Maitre d'Hotel Butter 68 

Cream Tomato Sauce 68 

Horseradish Sauce (for 

Roast Beef) 69 

Cucumber Sauce for Fish. . 69 

Brown Sauce for Mutton. . 69 
Mint Sauce (for Roast 

Lamb) 69 

SALADS. 

Chicken Salad 71 

Potato Salad 72 

Tomato Jelly for Salad. ... 72 
Cucumber Jelly for Cold 

Meats 73 

Perfection Salad 73 

Endive Salad 73 

Macedoine Salad 74 

Cucumber Salad 74 

Dressing for Fruit Salad. . . 74 

Sweetbread Salad 74 

Spanish Salad 75 

SALAD DRESSINGS. 

Mayonnaise 77 

Parsley Mayonnaise 77 

French Dressing 77 

Tartare Sauce 78 

Sauce Vinaigrette 78 

Cooked Salad Dressing. ... 78 

PICKLES, CATSUPS, 
SAUCES. 

The Brine 79 

Sliced Cucumber Pickle. . . 79 

Cucumber Pickle 80 

Cucumber Relish 80 

Mustard Pickle 81 

Green Tomato Pickle 81 

Pepper Hash 82 

Chow-Chow 82 

Chili Sauce 83 

Pepper Sauce 83 

Tomato Catsup 84 

Chutney Sauce 84 

Sliced Cucumber Relish ... 84 

Pickled Peaches 85 

Sweet Pear Pickle 85 



INDEX. 



11 



DESSERTS. 

Page. 



Plain Pastry for Pies 87 

Transparent Pudding 87 

Lemon Pie, No. 1 88 

Lemon Pie, No. 2 88 

Chocolate Pie 88 

Pumpkin Pie 89 

Molasses Pie 89 

Cocoanut Pie 89 

Jelly Pie, No. 1 90 

Jelly Pie, No. 2 90 

Caramel Pie 90 

George Washington Pie ... 90 

Apple Pudding 91 

Strawberry Short Cake. ... 91 

Bourbon Pudding 92 

Bellevue Pudding with Va- 
nilla Sauce 92 

Queen's Pudding 92 

Brown Betty 93 

Tapioca Pudding 93 

Corn Meal Pudding 93 

Cold Custard Rice 94 

Glorified Rice 94 

Rice Pudding 94 

Apple Pudding 95 

Peach Bavarian Cream. ... . 96 

Bavarian Cream 96 

Meringues 96 

Orange Charlotte 97 

Cup Custard 97 

Chocolate Custard 97 

Coffee Parfait 98 

Wine Jelly 98 

Prune Souffle 98 

Suet Pudding 99 

Christmas Pudding 99 

Date Pudding 100 

Fruit Pudding 100 

Sauce for a Sweet Pudding. 100 
Chocolate Sauce for Ice 

Cream 101 

Plain Sauce for Puddings . . 101 

Egg Sauce 101 

Eggnog Sauce for Frozen 
Pudding 101 

CAKE. 

Fruit Cake 105 

Sponge Cake 106 



Page. 



Jelly Cake 106 

White Cake, No. 1 106 

White Cake, No. 2 107 

White Cake, No. 3 107 

Devil's Food, No. 1 107 

Devil's Food, No. 2 108 

White Loaf Cake 108 

Orange Cake 108 

Walnut Cup Cakes 109 

Fruit Cookies 109 

Pecan Cookies 110 

Soft Ginger Cookies 110 

Cup Cake 110 

Brittle Ginger Snaps 110 

Pecan Cake Ill 

Cocoanut Drops Ill 

Ginger Cake Ill 

Ginger Bread 112 

Blackberry Jam Cake, 

No. 1 112 

Blackberry Jam Cake, 

No. 2 112 

Plain Pound Cake 113 

Quaker Oat Cakes 113 

Doughnuts, No. 1 114 

Doughnuts, No. 2 114 

Crullers . .114 

Hard Cookies 114 

Fillings for Cakes. 

Fondant Icing 117 

Caramel Icing, No. 1 117 

Caramel Icing, No. 2 117 

Marshmallow Icing 117 

White Icing 118 

Chocolate Icing, No. 1 ... .118 

Chocolate Icing, No. 2 118 

Prauline Icing 118 

Lemon Jelly Filling 118 

CREAMS, ICES. 

Vanilla Ice Cream, No. 1 . . 121 
Vanilla Ice Cream, No. 2. .121 

Peach Ice Cream 122 

Frozen Chocolate Custard. 122 

Frozen Custard 122 

Macaroon Cream 123 

Frozen Rice Pudding 123 

Lalla Rookh 123 



12 



INDEX. 



Page. 



Frozen Pudding 124 

French Strawberry Ice 

Cream 124 

Orange Ice 125 

Pineapple Ice 125 

Maple Glace 125 

Maple Parfait 126 

RELIABLE RECIPES FOR 
FRUIT. 

Preserving and Canning. .129 
Preserved Strawberries. ... 129 
Brandy Peaches 129 



Page. 



Preserved Pears 130 

Cherry Conserve 130 

Grape Conserve 130 

Orange .Marmalade, No. 1.131 
Orange Marmalade, No, 2.131 

Green Grape Jelly 131 

Currant Jelly 132 

Red Raspberry and Cur- 
rant Jelly 132 

Apple Jelly 132 

Cranberry Jelly 132 

Tables of Weights and 
Measures 135 



Bread. 



1 potato; >^|cake of yeast; 

1 teaspoonful of salt; 2 cups of water; 

1 tablespoonful of lard ; 1 tablespoonful of sugar. 
6 or 7 cups of flour. 

Boil the potato and mash through a fine sieve, 
reserving the water to make up sponge with. Meas- 
ure two cups of lukewarm potato water; dissolve 
the yeast in a little of it, into the other mix the salt, 
lard, sugar, and mashed potato. Add the dissolved 
yeast and enough of the flour to make a thin batter; 
beat for a minute or two. Let this sponge rise until 
filled with large bubbles. To it add more of the 
flour; turn on to biscuit board and work thirty min- 
utes, using as little flour as possible on the board. 
Rub well the bowl with lard and pat the dough into 
it. Set away from draughts and let rise until double 
its size. 

Cut down, form into loaves, and set to rise a 
second time in baking pan. This will take but an 
hour. Try a little flour in the oven — if it browns in 
five minutes the oven is just right for bread. Bake 
sixty minutes. When taken from the oven, turn the 
loaves out of the pan and support, so that the air 
will reach all sides. Do not put away until per- 
fectly cold. 

PLAIN ROLLS. 

1 pint of milk; 2 tablespoonfuls of lard; 

1 tablespoonful of sugar; >^ cake of yeast; 
1 teaspoonful of salt; yi cup of warm water; 

4 small cups of flour. 

Scald the milk, pour it over the lard, sugar, salt, 
and add flour to make a batter. Dissolve yeast in the 
warm water and add to the batter. Beat well and let 

13 



14 



BREAD. 



rise. Add enough flour to knead, and knead it 
thoroughly. Let rise until light; cut down, shape, let 
rise again, and bake in a quick oven. 

POTATO ROLLS. 



1 cup of flour; 

Y$ cup of lard (scant) ; 

^ cup of sugar; 

1 even teaspoonful of salt; 



1 cup of mashed potatoes ; 
1 cup of milk; 
yi cup of warm water ; 
^ of a cake of yeast. 



Dissolve yeast in the water. Mix flour, lard, 
potatoes, sugar, and salt. Scald the milk and let 
cool; add to all. Pour in dissolved yeast and beat as 
cake. Set to rise for two hours. Make into dough 
by adding five or six cups of flour. Knead for twenty 
minutes and set to rise again. Shape, rise, and bake. 



BEATEN BISCUIT. 

1 quart of flour; % cup of lard; 

1 cup of ice water; % teaspoonful of salt; 

A tiny pinch of baking powder. 

Beat with an iron until the dough blisters, or put 
through a machine. Bake twenty minutes in a 
moderate oven. — "The Blue Ribbon Cook Book." 



BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

1 pint of flour; 1 dessertspoonful of lard; 

1 teaspoonful of salt; 1 heaping teaspoonful of 

1 cup of milk; baking powder. 

Make up with a spoon pretty soft, turn on to 
biscuit board and work until quite smooth. Bake in 
a hot oven. 

SODA BISCUIT. 

1 quart of flour ; 1 level teaspoonful of soda ; 

1 teaspoonful of salt; 1 level teaspoonful of bak- 
1 rounding tablespoonful ing powder. 

of lard ; ^ of a pint of buttermilk. 



BREAD. 



15 



To the flour add the salt, soda, baking powder, 
and lard. Mix thoroughly. Turn in the buttermilk; 
make into a soft dough, pat down on the biscuit 
board, and cut into rounds. Bake in a quick oven 
about twenty minutes. 

SPOON BREAD. 

1 pint of boiling water ; 1 pint of cornmeal ; 
1 large tablespoonful of 1 pint of sweet milk; 
butter; 2 eggs; 

y^. teaspoonful of salt. 

Pour the boiling water over the cornmeal and 
add the salt; then butter. To the milk add the 
beaten yolks, and turn into the cornmeal mixture. 
Beat the whites and fold in last. Pour into a but- 
tered pan and bake thirty minutes. Serve with a 
spoon from the pan. 

BATTER BREAD. 

1 pint of fine hominy; 3 eggs; 

1 large tablespoonful of butter ; 1 pint of milk; 

1 pint of cornmeal ; Generous pinch of salt. 

Boil the hominy ; while hot beat in the butter and 
the well beaten eggs; add the milk and cornmeal. 
Season with salt. The batter should be of the con- 
sistency of boiled custard — if too thick, add a little 
more milk. Bake with a good deal of heat at bottom 
in a well greased pan, and eat for breakfast. 

WAFFLES. 

2 pints of flour; \]4 pints of sour milk; 
1 teaspoonful of soda; 2 eggs; 

1 tablespoonful of melted lard ; Salt to taste. 

Beat the eggs separately — put in the whites just 
before baking. The secret of good waffle baking is 
to have the irons hot and keep the fire an even 
temperature. 



16 



BREAD. 



MILK TOAST. 

Toast four large slices of home-made bread a light 
brown. Have a pan of boiling water on the stove. 
Quickly dip each slice of toast into it, spread thickly 
with butter and dust with salt. Put in deep dish 
and place in warmer. Melt one teaspoonful of butter, 
add one of flour and a half pint of milk. Stir until 
thickened a little, and add an even teaspoonful of 
powdered sugar. Pour this cream sauce over the 
moistened toast, and serve very hot. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

2 eggs; cup of New Orleans 

1^2 cups of buttermilk; molasses; 

1 cup of cornmeal ; Pinch of salt ; 

2 cups of brown flour; 1 teaspoonful of soda. 

Dissolve the soda in a tiny portion of boiling 
water; add to the molasses. Mix all together and 
beat as cake. Put in greased mold and steam three 
hours. A cup of seeded raisins may be added if you 
like it. 

POPOVERS. 

1 egg; 1 cup of sweet milk; 

^2 teaspoonful of salt; 1 cup of flour. 

Put the milk in a bowl; beat into it the yolk of 
the egg. Mix the salt with the flour and beat it into 
the milk. Add the stiffly-beaten white last, and 
pour into well-greased, hot gem pans, filling them 
half full. The secret of making good popovers lies 
entirely in the baking. The oven must be very hot 
at first to raise them, and gradually cool to bake 
them thoroughly. Send from the oven to the table — 
they fall when the heat is lost. 

SALLY LUNN. 



1 quart of flour; 
1 pint of milk; 
3 teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder ; 



Butter size of an egg; 
2 eggs; 

6 tablespoonf uls of sugar ; 
1 even teaspoonful of salt. 



BREAD. 



17 



To flour add the butter, sugar, salt, and baking 
powder. Mix well. Add the milk and eggs, beaten 
separately. Turn into greased pans and bake. Serve 
very hot with plenty of butter. This recipe will 
make two deep layers. 

RICE WAFFLES. 

pint of rice; % lb. of butter; 

A pinch of salt; \% pints of flour; 

5 eggs (beaten separately) ; 1 quart of milk. 

Boil the rice and let it cool. Mix with it the butter 
and salt. Sift into it the flour and with the yolks 
of the eggs one quart of milk. Beat hard and add 
the stiffly-beaten whites last. Pour into hot waffle 
irons and bake, being careful to pour off any grease 
that the irons have not taken up before pouring in 
the batter. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

1 quart of water; 1 cake of yeast; 
Generous pinch of salt; Pinch of soda; 

1 tablespoonful of molasses. 

Into the lukewarm water put the yeast, broken 
in pieces, the salt, and enough buckwheat to make 
a thin batter. Set to rise over night. In the morning 
put in the pinch of soda and the molasses. Beat 
well and cook on hot griddle. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

2 cups of graham flour; cup of white flour; 

^3 cup of granulated sugar ; \% cups of sweet milk; 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking Pinch of salt; 

powder; 1 cup of hickory nut 
1 cup of raisins; meats. 

Mix all well and bake one hour in a slow oven. 
Very good to butter and serve with salad. 



18 



BREAD. 



NUT BREAD. 

4 cups of flour; 4 teaspoonfuls of baking 
>2 teaspoonful of salt ; powder; 

1 cup of sugar ; 1 cup of walnut meats 

2 cups of milk; (broken). 

Sift the baking powder with the flour and mix in 
dry ingredients; then mix with milk. Add salt. 
Let stand twenty minutes to rise, and bake three- 
quarters of an hour in a slow oven. 



CORN MUFFINS. 

1 pint of meal; >^ pint of milk; 

1 tablespoonful of lard ; 2 eggs ; 

1 heaping teaspoonful of >^ teaspoonful of salt, 
baking powder; 

Beat the eggs separately until very light. Then 
add to the yolks the meal, baking powder, and salt 
(sifted together). Then the lard melted, the milk; 
and when just ready to pour into the hot, buttered 
rings, add the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff, 
dry froth. — "The Blue Ribbon Cook Book." 



CORN DODGERS. 

To one quart of cornmeal add a little salt and a 
small tablespoonful of lard. Scald with boiling water 
and beat hard for a few minutes. Drop from a spoon 
into a well-greased pan. Have the batter just thick 
enough to flatten on the bottom, leaving them quite 
high. 

CINNAMON BUNS. 

When yeast bread is ready to knead from the 
sponge, knead and roll out three-fourths of an inch 
thick. Spread a thick coating of butter over the 
dough, a generous sprinkling of granulated sugar, 
and dust well with cinnamon. Roll up as you would 
a jelly cake, and cut down in inch slices. Put to rise 



BREAD. 



19 



in well-greased muffin rings. Brush the top of each 
bun with butter, sprinkle with sugar and dust with 
cinnamon. Bake as rolls. 

CINNAMON CAKE. 

1 cup of sugar; 2 cups of milk; 
Yolks of 3 eggs; 1 quart of flour; 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter; 3 tablespoonfuls of bak- 

ing powder. 

Cream the butter; add sugar, the beaten yolks, 
a part of the milk; then a little flour, more milk, and 
sift the baking powder into the last part of flour. 
Put in a tiny pinch of salt. Pour into a greased pan 
and bake as cake, with plenty of melted butter, 
sugar, and cinnamon on top. 



20 BREAD. 



BREAD. 21 



22 BREAD. 



Soups. 



The making of nutritious soup requires a little prac- 
tice. The base for soup is lean, uncooked meat — a 
pound of meat to a quart of water. A mixture of 
meats makes a more highly-flavored soup than any 
single meat. Beef, mutton, chicken, or veal make a 
good combination. Where richness is liked, a small 
ham bone will greatly improve the flavor of the soup. 

The legs of all meats and the feet of chickens are 
rich in gelatine, making a very smooth stock. 

In adding vegetables to a prepared stock, allow 
just enough time to cook them thoroughly, as much 
boiling injures the flavor of the stock. 

Good soup-making requires skillful tasting. 

Use cold water in making soup. Watch carefully 
the first hour, and skim frequently. 

Simmer all stock; do not allow it to boil violently; 
it will become cloudy. 

To clear stock: Beat the white of an egg with 
four tablespoonfuls of water; crush the shell and add 
to the water and egg, then to the stock. Boil five 
minutes and set on back of range to settle. Strain 
through cheesecloth or old napkin dipped in cold 
water. 

Much depends upon the cleanliness of the soup 
pot — keep it well scoured. 

CLEAR SOUP STOCK. 

4 lbs. of lean beef ; 4 quarts of cold water. 

Wash the meat and put it in the water without 
salt; let it come slowly to boiling point, skimming 
frequently the first hour. Add salt and continue to 
simmer the stock for four hours on back of range. 
Add a pinch of black pepper and strain into a jar. 

23 



24 



SOUPS. 



Set away over night. Remove all grease and it is 
ready for use. 

In cool weather this stock will keep many days, 
but in warm weather it must be thoroughly heated 
each morning to keep it sweet. Just bring to boiling 
point. 



Wipe beef and cut the lean meat in large pieces. 
Brown about one-half of the meat in marrow from 
the bone or a tablespoonful of drippings. Put re- 
maining meat with bone and fat into the soup kettle, 
add water and let stand fifteen or twenty minutes, 
or until the water is red. Put on back of range and 
let slowly come to boiling point. When it begins to 
simmer, add the browned meat. Cover and simmer 
very slowly for six hours. Add the vegetables one 
hour before the cooking is completed. Do not put 
in the salt until the stock is ready to remove from 
the fire. Strain it through a close cloth or a fine 
sieve. When cold remove grease from top and 
season with salt and pepper. 



Soak the beans over night. Place in soup pot 
with the beef bone. Add the tomatoes, onion, cloves, 
and fill the pot with cold water. Simmer slowly all 
day. Mash the beans through a colander, and strain 
the whole. Season with a little Tobasco, Worcester- 
shire, salt, pepper, and add the sherry. When serv- 
ing, put a slice of lemon to each portion, and a little 
finely-chopped hard-boiled egg. 



6 lbs. shin of beef ; 
1 tablespoonful of salt; 
6 cloves; 
Y /2 bay leaf; 
1 sprig of thyme ; 




BLACK BEAN SOUP. 



]/ 2 pint black beans; 
2 cups of tomatoes; 
9 cloves; 



10 cent beef bone; 

silver onion ; 
1 glass of sherry wine. 



i 



SOUPS. 



25 



VEGETABLE SOUP. 



10 cent beef soup bone; 

1 teaspoonful of salt; 
cup each of celery, 
corn, potatoes, and 
beans ; 

1 tablespoonful of Wor- 
cestershire sauce; 



3 quarts of water; 

Yi saltspoonful of cayenne; 

Small carrot (grated) ; 

of an onion (sliced) ; 
1 pint of okra; 
1 tablespoonful of chili 
sauce or catsup. 



Cover the soup bone with the water. Bring to 
boiling point and simmer on back of range, keeping 
closely covered, for two hours. Set away to cool, and 
remove all grease. Cut meat in small pieces and 
return to the stock. Season with the salt, pepper, 
and add the vegetables. Simmer for one hour, and 
put in sauce. Make a thickening of two tablespoon- 
fuls of flour and a little water. Stir until perfectly 
smooth, and turn into soup. Let boil five minutes 
and remove soup pot to a cooler part of the range 
until ready to serve. 



QUICK BOUILLON. 



1 tablespoonful of butter; 
\y 2 lbs. lean beef; 

chicken (bones broken) ; 

2 slices of carrot ; 

2 sprigs of parsley; 

1 egg (white 



1 small onion (sliced) ; 
1 stalk of celery; 
4 cloves; 
1 bay leaf ; 

\y2 pints of cold water; 
and shell). 



Melt the butter and add the onion. Cook until 
the onion is thoroughly done, then add the beef and 
chicken, celery, cloves, carrot, bay leaf, parsley, and 
cold water. Cover the saucepan and set on back of 
range where the water will slowly heat. Let it come 
to a boiling point, strain, and return to saucepan and 
bring to a boil. Beat the white of one egg in one-half 
cup of water until thoroughly blended, crush the shell 
and add to egg and water, and then to the boiling 
bouillon. Boil four minutes, let stand a minute to 
settle, and strain through a cheese-cloth wrung out of 
cold water. — "The Blue Ribbon Cook Book." 



26 



SOUPS. 



CHICKEN GUMBO. 



2 lbs. of the round of beef; 
Small piece of ham bone; 
A square inch of onion ; 

1 large potato; 

2 large ears of corn ; 



1 chicken; 

1 slice of green pepper; 
3 pints of okra; 
1 quart of tomatoes ; 
3 quarts of water. 



Put the beef, ham bone, half of the chicken (with 
bones well broken), green pepper, onion, and a good 
seasoning of salt into the soup pot. Cover with the 
water and simmer gently, skimming often, for two 
hours. At the end of this time add the okra, which 
has been cut in small pieces and fried in the smallest 
quantity of butter possible; the potato, cut in pieces; 
and the tomatoes (stewed until soft with a tea- 
spoonful of sugar). Cut the corn from the cobs, 
and add with the cobs to the soup. Continue to boil 
for another hour, then remove the bones and meat. 
Cut meat into very small pieces and return to soup. 
Season with a little more salt and a dash of cayenne 
pepper; a tablespoonful of Worcestershire sauce. 
Fry the other half of the chicken as you would for 
the table, and cut into tiny bits — add to soup. Just 
before taking from the fire, turn in a glass of sherry 
wine. 

Serve with the soup a little rice boiled very dry. 
Some like to add a spoonful of it. "Southern Rice" 
is very nice used in this way. 

BISQUE OF OYSTERS. 

1 quart of oysters ; 1 cup of heated cream ; 

3 cups of milk; 2 tablespoonfuls of flour; 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 

Heat the oysters in their own liquor until they 
curl; chop in small pieces. Melt the butter in a 
saucepan, add the flour and stir until quite smooth. 
Season with salt and pepper, and add the milk. 
Continue stirring until it becomes a thick sauce. 
Turn in the chopped oysters and, when ready to 
serve, add the heated cream. 



SOUPS. 



27 



TOMATO PUREE. 



1 can of tomatoes; 

1 bay leaf ; 

1 stalk of celery ; 

1 teaspoonful of sugar; 



1 pint of brown stock; 
1 sprig of parsley; 
1 tablespoonful of butter; 
Several slices of onion. 



Put the tomatoes into a saucepan with the brown 
stock, bay leaf, parsley, celery, and sugar; simmer 
thoroughly. Put the onions and butter into a saute 
pan, and, when the onion is thoroughly done — but 
not brown — add a tablespoonful of flour, and put all 
with the tomatoes; season with salt and pepper. 
Pass the whole through a fine sieve, heat again, and 
serve. — "The Blue Ribbon Cook Book." 



MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

1 calf's head; 1 carrot; 

yi bunch of parsley; 1 onion; 

1 bay leaf ; 1 turnip ; 

10 cloves; 1 leek; 

1 tablespoonful of catsup; 1 glass of sherry wine; 

1 tablespoonful of Wor- 2 tablespoonfuls of but- 
cestershire sauce; ter; 

4 even tablespoonfuls of flour. 

Unjoint the jaw of the head and remove the 
brains. Wash all well in several cold waters. Put 
all the meat into the soup kettle and cover well with 
water (plenty of water) ; set over a very moderate 
fire; skim repeatedly and let boil slowly about two 
hours. Take out all meat and put bones back in 
soup kettle. Add the vegetables, cut in small pieces, 
salt and pepper to taste. Let simmer two hours 
longer, strain and set away over night. In the 
morning remove all grease, and cut the meat, in- 
cluding the tongue, into nice pieces and return to the 
soup. Put two tablespoonfuls of butter into a sauce- 
pan, stir until it browns; add four even tablespoonfuls 
of flour, and mix until very smooth. Add to the soup 
and boil five minutes, stirring all the time. Take 



28 



SOUPS. 



from the fire, season with a tablespoonful of catsup, 
one of Worcestershire sauce, and the glass of sherry. 
In serving add a very thin slice of lemon to each 
soup plate and grate the yolks of two hard-boiled 
eggs and chop the whites. Put a spoonful into each 
plate. 

This is a very delicious soup. 

OX TAIL SOUP. 

2 ox tails ; 1 stalk of celery ; 

1 onion ; 4 quarts of water ; 

3 cloves; 1 tablespoonful of salt; 

A sprig of parsley. 

Cut the tails in pieces. Cook the onion (finely 
chopped) in a little bacon fat; add the cut-up tails, 
and let brown. Put into the soup pot the water, add 
tails and onion, celery, parsley, and cloves, and let 
simmer for three hours. Season with salt and pepper 
before taking from the fire. Set aside to cool. Re- 
move all grease from top, strain, add a few pieces of 
the tails, and heat very hot. 



TOMATO BISQUE. 



>2 can of tomatoes ; 
1 level teaspoonful of salt; 
A generous pinch of soda; 
Yz teaspoonful of sugar; 



1 quart of milk; 
Dash of white pepper ; 
A small pinch of cayenne ; 
1 tablespoonful of butter. 



Cook the tomatoes until soft; strain them through 
a fine sieve. Into a saucepan put the sugar, salt, 
and pepper; add the strained tomatoes. When hot, 
add the soda. Heat the milk in double boiler for ten 
minutes. When ready to serve add the butter to 
the tomatoes and pour the hot milk over all. Do 
not mix until the last minute, as it will curdle if left 
standing. 



SOUPS. 



29 



FRESH MUSHROOM SOUP. 

1 lb. of fresh mushrooms; 1 cup of cream; 

1 quart of white stock; 1 even teaspoonful of salt; 

1 tablespoonful of butter; 1 saltspoonful of pepper 

1 tablespoonful of flour; (even). 

Run some cold water over the mushrooms — do 
not let them stand in it. Peel, cut off stems, and 
scrape them. Cut in small pieces; add to the stock 
and boil fifteen minutes. Make a roux of the butter 
and flour (do not let it brown). Add this to the 
stock and mushrooms and stir until it thickens. 
Season with the salt and pepper, and at serving time 
turn in the heated cream. 



CREAM OF CHESTNUT SOUP. 

1 lb. of chestnuts; 1 quart of veal or chicken 

Pepper and salt; stock; 

1 large cup of cream. 

Pour boiling water over the chestnuts and let stand 
until the skins can be easily removed. Look them 
over carefully and break in pieces. To the quart of 
stock allow two small cups of the chestnuts. Cover 
the saucepan closely and simmer for thirty minutes. 
Mash the chestnuts through a sieve and return them 
to the soup. Season with the salt and pepper. When 
ready to serve, add the heated cream. 

CREAM OF SPINACH. 



peck of spinach ; 
1 cup of cream; 
1 tablespoonful of butter; 



1 quart of white stock; 
Salt and pepper; 
1 heaping tablespoonful of 
flour. 



Wash the spinach through several waters, and 
cook without water in a closely-covered vessel for 
twenty minutes. Pass it through a fine sieve and add 
the stock. Make a roux of the butter and flour, and 
stir into the stock. Season with salt and pepper and 
add the heated cream just before serving. 



30 



SOUPS. 



CREAM OF ASPARAGUS. 

1 quart of white stock; 1 pint of cream; 
1 can of asparagus; 1 tablespoonful of butter; 

1 heaping teaspoonful of flour. 

Put a little more than a quart of white stock 
(either chicken or veal) on the fire with the asparagus, 
and let them boil hard for fifteen minutes; then 
strain, pressing all the substance from the asparagus. 

Reserve the tips of asparagus to serve in puree. 
Thicken the strained stock with the flour and butter, 
and just before serving add the cream, salt, and 
pepper. — "The Blue Ribbon Cook Book." 



SOUPS. 31 



32 SOUPS. 



Soup Garnishings. 



NOODLES. 

To one egg, slightly beaten, add two teaspoonfuls 
of water and a half teaspoonful of salt. Put in 
enough flour to make a stiff dough. Work it for ten 
or fifteen minutes, adding flour, if necessary. When 
perfectly firm and smooth, roll out as thin as paper 
on floured board. Let stand for twenty minutes, 
when it will roll into a tight roll (as jelly roll). Cut 
down in very thin slices and unroll them. Put aside 
to dry, and boil twenty minutes in salted water. 

CROUTONS. 

Cut bread into small squares and saute in hot 
butter; or spread the squares with butter and toast 
in hot oven. 

MEAT BALLS FOR SOUP. 

To a large cupful of any finely-chopped or ground 
meat add a seasoning of salt, pepper, paprika, parsley, 
onion juice, and celery salt. Beat in one egg to bind 
the meat, and a little flour. Roll into small marble- 
like balls, sprinkle with flour and fry in butter or 
poach in boiling water. Drop into the soup just 
before serving. 



33 



SOUP GARNISHINGS. 



Fish, Lobster, Shell-Fish. 



Fish must be perfectly fresh to be good. When 
fresh, the eyes are bright and the flesh perfectly firm. 
It must be carefully cleaned, well washed, and wiped 
dry. If not to be used immediately, put it on ice 
(skin side down), but do not allow it to come in 
contact with milk, butter, or other foods. 

Allow ten minutes to the pound for boiling fish. 
Put it into warm water and bring rapidly to boiling 
point, then simmer until done. In the water put a 
good seasoning of salt, the juice and rind of a small 
lemon, a large spoonful of malt vinegar, and a few 
slices of soup vegetables. 

TO PLANK A FISH. 

In a coal stove it requires a very hot oven to 
plank a fish properly; but the even, strong heat of 
the gas stove is ideal. Light both burners under the 
oven, and put the plank in the oven for fifteen min- 
utes. Turn it about, up and down several times, 
that it may become thoroughly heated all through. 
Split the fish down the back, lay on the plank, skin 
side down. Brush it over with butter or salt pork 
drippings, and dust with pepper and salt. Put into 
the oven directly under the flame, or into the coal 
stove in a very hot oven for thirty or forty min- 
utes to bake. In a cup put plenty of melted butter, a 
little lemon juice, and a seasoning of cayenne pepper. 
Keep it hot and baste the fish often with it. 

Planks for the purpose can be easily bought. 
When using a new one, it is well to rub it over with 
sweet olive oil before placing the fish upon it. After 
a little time it will become well seasoned, and will 
retain enough of the juices to keep the fish from 
sticking. Never wash a fish plank; rub it clean and 

35 



36 FISH, LOBSTER, SHELL-FISH. 



keep in a muslin bag, away from the dust. Shad, 
butter fish, Spanish mackerel, pompano, trout, 
salmon, and white fish are at their best when planked. 

FISH CHOPS. 

1 pint of boiled fish; 1 cupful of milk; 

1 even teaspoonful of salt; % teaspoonful of pepper; 
Yolks of 2 eggs; 1 tablespoonful of butter; 

2 heaping tablespoonfuls 1 teaspoonful of chopped 

of flour; parsley. 

Melt the butter; rub into it the flour, let bubble a 
minute, then add the milk (heated). Cook until 
thickened and remove from fire. Add the beaten 
yolks, stirring all the time, and return to fire to cook 
the eggs. Season the fish with salt and pepper, and 
squeeze a little lemon juice over it. Mix in the sauce 
and add the chopped parsley. Spread on flat dish to 
stiffen. Let stand several hours; it will then mold 
without difficulty. Make out in chop form, roll in 
beaten egg (diluted with a tablespoonful of water to 
one egg), then in crumbs and put aside to harden 
before frying. When ready to fry, immerse in smoking 
fat and color a light brown. Serve with a Hollandaise 
sauce or a rich tomato sauce. 

COD FISH BALLS, No. 1. 

Soak over night one large cupful of boneless 
cod fish. In the morning pull it to pieces (uncooked) ; 
to this add two cupfuls of cooked, mashed, Irish po- 
tatoes, one egg, a teaspoonful of butter, and a large 
kitchen spoonful of cream. Dust with cayenne. 
Make into balls the size of a small egg, dredge with 
flour, and fry to a good brown in hot fat. 

COD FISH BALLS, No. 2. 

Pick to pieces, in a deep pan of water, one cup of 
raw salt fish. Pare and cut in quarters one pint of 
potatoes. Put these together in a stewpan and 



FISH, LOBSTER, SHELL-FISH. 37 



cover with boiling water. Boil twenty-five minutes, 
or until potatoes are soft. Do not boil until potatoes 
are soggy. Drain off all water, mash and beat the 
mixture until very light. Add one teaspoonful of 
butter and one-half saltspoonful of pepper. When 
slightly cooled, add one egg, well beaten, and more 
salt, if needed. Fry but five at a time in deep fat, 
as more will cool the lard too much. Dip a large 
spoon in the hot lard, take up a spoonful of the 
cod fish mixture and drop into the lard. Drain on 
manilla paper. 

FRIED HALIBUT. 

Have the steaks cut about one inch thick. Re- 
move skin and bone; wash and wipe dry; season with 
salt and pepper and dip in cornmeal. Immerse in 
hot fat and fry a rich brown. Serve with a maitre 
d 'hotel sauce or sauce tartare. 

CREAMED WHITE FISH. 

Cover a white fish weighing about three pounds 
with warm water (not hot) ; add a teaspoonful of 
salt, a kitchen spoonful of malt vinegar and the juice, 
and rind of half a lemon. Let it come rapidly to 
boiling point, then draw to a cooler part of the range 
and simmer for thirty minutes. When the fish is 
done, allow it to cool a little, and with two forks pull 
it into large flakes. Make a sauce of one large table- 
spoonful of butter, melted, and one scant tablespoon- 
ful of flour rubbed into it. A generous half-pint of 
cream or rich milk poured slowly over the thickening. 
Stir until thickened and creamy. Season the flaked 
fish with a half teaspoonful of salt, a saltspoonful 
of white pepper, and a pinch of cayenne. With a 
fork mix the sauce through the fish and taste to see 
if salty enough. Put into a buttered dish, spread 
crumbs over the entire top, and dot with bits of 
butter. Set dish in water in oven, and bake until 
nicely | browned. 
4 



38 FISH, LOBSTER, SHELL-FISH, 



SCALLOPED LOBSTER. 

Cut into small pieces one pint of lobster meat. 
Into a saucepan put one and a half tablespoonfuls of 
butter, and when it melts rub into it the same amount 
of flour. Cook until smooth, and add very slowly 
one cupful of veal or chicken stock and one-half 
cupful of rich cream. Season with one-half teaspoon- 
ful of salt, a dash of cayenne, and a saltspoonful of 
paprika. Continue to stir until smooth and creamy. 
Add the lobster meat and fill the half of shell with the 
mixture. Squeeze a few drops of lemon juice over 
each filled shell, and sprinkle bread crumbs over 
all. Dot with bits of butter, and run into the oven 
to brown. 

LOBSTER a LA NEWBURG. 

2 lobsters; 1 pint of cream; 

4 eggs (yolks) ; Wineglass of sherry wine ; 

1 large tablespoonful of butter. 

Take the meat of the lobsters and cut in large 
pieces ; put in the chafing dish with the butter, pepper 
and salt to taste, and wine. Let this begin to simmer. 
Beat the yolks of the eggs just enough to change 
the color, and add to the cream. Pour this mixture 
over the lobster and seasoning, and stir until it thick- 
ens. Do not allow it to boil, as it will curdle. Serve 
on toast. 

SALMON LOAF. 

1 can of salmon ; 1 tablespoonful of flour; 

1 teaspoonful of salt; Dash of cayenne; 

^4 teaspoonful of mustard ; 2 tablespoonfuls of vine- 

1 egg (slightly beaten J ; gar ; 

^ cup of milk; 2 teaspoonfuls of gelatine. 

Remove bones, skin, and flake the salmon. Into 
a double boiler put the salt, flour, mustard, cayenne, 
milk, and egg; add the vinegar last; stir until thick. 
Dissolve the gelatine in a tiny portion of cold water 



FISH, LOBSTER, SHELL-FISH. 39 

and add one spoonful of boiling water. Pour the 
mixture in double boiler over the fish, add gelatine, 
and pack in mold to harden. Serve with mayonnaise 
dressing. 

OYSTERS PENDENNIS. 

Get large oysters, in the shell — saddlerocks are 
very nice for this purpose. Wash the shells with a 
brush in cold water; open, leaving them on the half 
shell and place in a pan. Grind the bread crumbs 
and run through a sieve to make quite fine; season 
with salt and pepper. Cover each oyster well with 
the crumbs and add a square of bacon on top. Dot 
with bits of butter and run into a hot oven. Bake 
to a delicious brown and serve with plenty of melted 
butter with a few drops of lemon juice for each oyster. 

OYSTER FILLING FOR PATTIES. 

Cook one pint of oysters in their own liquor until 
plump. Melt one tablespoonful of butter, add to it 
one of flour; cook until smooth. Turn in slowly, 
stirring all the time, a generous half-pint of cream. 
Season with an even teaspoonful of salt, a saltspoonful 
of pepper, and a dash of cayenne. Stir until smooth 
and add oysters. Heat thoroughly and fill the 
heated patty shells or bread-cups. The sauce should 
be just thick enough to be creamy and not pasty. 
Add a little more cream at the last if it seems so. 

SHAD ROE. 

Shad roe is at its best when broiled, but this is 
not possible in every kitchen, so a good recipe is 
given here for cooking it. Wash and dry the roe with 
great care — do not break the skin. Place in steamer 
and steam for fifteen minutes. Melt a large piece of 
butter in a skillet; season the roe with salt and 
pepper. Lift it with care from the steamer to the 
hot skillet and brown it quickly on both sides. Serve 
with a maitre d 'hotel sauce. 



40 FISH, LOBSTER, SHELL-FISH. 



OYSTERS FOR LATE SUPPER. 

1 pint of oysters ; % pint of cream ; 

^2 cup of oyster juice; Yolks of 2 eggs; 
\}4 tablespoonfuls of flour; }4 teaspoonful of salt; 
1 tablespoonful of butter; Dash of cayenne. 

Scald the oysters in their liquor until their ears 
curl. Place on hot dish. Melt the butter, stir into 
it the flour and continue stirring until well cooked. 
Add slowly the oyster juice; then the cream and 
season with the salt and pepper. Take from fire and 
cool; add the beaten yolks and heat again, but do 
not allow it to boil, as it will curdle. Pour over the 
oysters and serve at once. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Take a large white china meat platter that will 
stand the heat of the oven. Butter it well and place 
a layer of oysters on it. Season some bread crumbs 
with salt, pepper, and a little parsley, chopped very 
fine. Sprinkle over the oysters, and dot bits of 
butter here and there. Add another layer of oysters 
and seasoned crumbs and cover the top with strips 
of breakfast bacon with bits of butter in between. 
Put but two layers of oysters in the dish; run into a 
hot oven and bake for forty minutes. Use plenty 
of butter. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Season some corn meal with a generous pinch of 
salt and a dusting of pepper. Fry as many strips of 
bacon as you think will be needed, and add to it some 
drippings. Set the bacon aside until oysters are 
ready. Dip the oysters in the seasoned meal and 
immerse in the hot fat. Fry a golden brown and 
serve very hot with the crisp strips of bacon. 



FISH, LOBSTER, SHELL-FISH. 



FISH, LOBSTER, SHELL-FISH. 



Meats. 



BEEF "a LA MODE. 

Wash and wipe a round of beef weighing five or 
six pounds ; with a sharp knife make several incisions 
in the meat and push in strips of salt pork. Remove 
the bone, tie firmly with a strong cord, and skewer 
well to keep it in shape. In a dutch oven or large 
iron pot put two large kitchen spoonfuls of drippings. 
When hot, turn the beef and brown on all sides. 
Make a rich stuffing of bread crumbs, highly seasoned 
with salt and pepper and a little chopped onion. 
Brown this stuffing just a little in plenty of butter 
and fill the cavity where the bone was. Place the 
stuffed beef on an inverted plate in the dutch oven, 
pour about it two quarts of boiling water. To the 
water add one onion, one carrot, and one turnip, cut 
in small pieces; a sprig of parsley, and two dried 
mushrooms (soaked for a few minutes in a little water). 
Put in one teaspoonful of salt and over the top of 
roast a few slices of salt pork. Sift a little flour over 
the meat and cover closely. Bake in a slow oven 
for five hours, basting frequently. Serve the vege- 
tables with the meat and make a thickened gravy 
of the stock in the pot. Season highly with salt 
and plenty of pepper. 

ROAST BEEF. 

For rare roast allow eight to ten minutes per 
pound; well done, ten to fifteen minutes. Wash and 
dry the beef; put on rack in double roasting pan and 
dredge the top and sides with flour. Put into a very 
hot oven for fifteen minutes, or until browned; then 
lower the temperature by shutting off the drafts. 
Sprinkle a half teaspoonful of salt and a dusting of 
pepper into the pan, and add a cupful of boiling 
water. Cook slowly until done, basting frequently. 

43 



44 



MEATS, 



YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

(To Serve With Roast Beef.) 

2 eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls of flour; 

Pinch of salt ; 2 teaspoonf uls baking 

powder. 

Beat the eggs separately. To the yolks add the 
flour, salt, and baking powder. Fold in the beaten 
whites last. Bake half an hour in larded pan under 
the roast, that the drippings may enrich the pudding. 
A pan for the purpose can be bought with rack for 
roast to rest upon. 

ROAST SPRING LAMB. 

Lamb must be thoroughly cooked. Wipe it 
with a damp cloth, put in roasting pan and dust 
with pepper. Dissolve a teaspoonful of salt in a 
cup of water and put in bottom of pan. Run into a 
hot oven for the first fifteen minutes, then cook 
slowly, basting every fifteen minutes. Allow twenty 
minutes to the pound. Serve with mint sauce. 

ROAST LEG OF MUTTON. 

Time for roasting mutton rare, ten minutes to 
the pound; fairly well done, fifteen minutes. Put in 
double roaster in a hot oven for fifteen or twenty 
minutes, then add a cup of boiling water, pepper 
and salt. Cook slowly and baste often. 

MUTTON CHOPS. 

Season the chops with salt and pepper; dip in 
beaten egg, then in bread crumbs, and fry in hot fat 
for six or eight minutes, or until nicely browned. 
Very good served with a rich tomato sauce. 

MUTTON CHOPS EN CASSEROLE. 

Have the butcher cut the chops one and a half 
inches thick, bone and roll them; season well with 
salt and pepper, and dredge with flour. Fry in hot 



MEATS. 



45 



fat until nicely browned. Pour all grease from the 
skillet and melt a tablespoonful of butter; to it add a 
heaping tablespoonful of flour and rub until quite 
smooth. Slowly pour over this thickening one pint 
of beef stock, and stir until smooth and a little 
thickened. Take from the fire and add one onion 
and one carrot, cut in tiny pieces; two tablespoonfuls 
of tomato catsup, and one of Worcestershire sauce. 
Arrange the chops in casserole dish, and pour over 
them the mixture. Cover closely and cook in oven 
for one and a half hours. Serve with sauce left in 
the dish. 

MOCK DUCK. 

Take a large, round steak; spread it with flour 
and pound it hard to make it tender. 

Make a dressing as for turkey, of one cup of 
bread crumbs; moisten with plenty of butter, and 
season with salt and pepper and a very little chopped 
onion and sage. Spread on steak, roll and firmly 
tie or secure it with skewers. Put half a can of 
tomatoes, thinned with a cupful of water, around 
the steak, and bake for one hour, basting frequently. 
Cut several slices of onion into the tomatoes, add a 
seasoning of salt and a teaspoonful of Worcestershire 
sauce. When done, remove skewers or string, strain 
the sauce, and if not thick enough add a small portion 
of flour and let boil a moment. 

MOCK TERRAPIN. 

1 calf's head; 1 lb. of calves' liver; 

2 silver onions; 1 tablespoonful of pepper; 
>2 teaspoonful of nutmeg; teaspoonful of allspice; 
Salt to taste; yi lb. of butter; 

1 wine glass of sherry wine. 

Boil liver until tender, and head until bones can 
be pulled out; cut in large pieces. Chop the onions 
very fine and mix with the seasonings. Put all to- 
gether and bake in a buttered dish; cover the top 
with bread crumbs and tiny bits of butter to brown 
it. 



46 



MEATS. 



ROAST PORK. 

Select a rib roast with tenderloin left in. Put a 
cupful of water into the roasting pan with the pork; 
season it with salt and pepper. Bake it slowly in a 
moderate oven, allowing twenty-five minutes to the 
pound. Pork must be cooked until nearly ready to 
leave the bone. Serve apple sauce with roast pork. 

BREADED PORK CHOPS. 

Take the rib chops; season with salt and pepper; 
dip into beaten egg, then into bread crumbs, and 
fry in drippings until nicely browned — twenty or 
twenty-five minutes. Serve with tomato or cream 
sauce. 

CURRIED MEAT. 

To one quart of meat, cut in small pieces, and 
plenty of gravy, add one tablespoonful of curry 
powder, one tablespoonful of flour, one tablespoonful 
of vinegar, one tablespoonful of chutney,, and one 
teaspoonful of sugar. Boil a few minutes and add 
a little more thickening if needed. All cold meats 
are very nice used in this way. 

BOILED HAM, No. 1. 

Soak the ham over night; put into cold water 
and let it slowly come to boiling point, then simmer 
slowly for five hours. The last hour put three turnips, 
three carrots, and three onions (with three cloves 
stuck in each onion) into the water, and add a pint 
of vinegar. Let the vegetables boil with the ham 
until it is done; skin. Take a teaspoonful of dry mus- 
tard, the yolk of an egg, a tablespoonful of flour, 
and enough vinegar to make a soft batter, and spread 
over the top of ham. Cover with bread crumbs and 
bake in the oven to a nice brown. 



MEATS. 



47 



BOILED HAM, No. 2. 

Soak the ham over night in cold water; wash it 
thoroughly and put into kettle with enough cold 
water to cover it, and heat to boiling point; let it 
boil slowly for four or five hours, or until the bone 
will turn. Remove kettle from range and allow to 
cool before taking out the ham. Trim off the outside 
and a large portion of the fat ; sprinkle with a generous 
amount of dark-brown sugar and stick with cloves 
every few inches. Baste for an hour in oven with a 
large cupful of vinegar from any sweet pickle you 
may have on hand, or sherry wine. 

ROAST VEAL. 

Veal, like lamb, must be thoroughly cooked to be 
digestible; allow eighteen or twenty minutes to the 
pound for roasting. It requires more seasoning than 
other meats, and a few slices of larding pork laid on 
top of the roast will greatly improve the flavor. 
Cook it slowly and thoroughly, but do not dry it 
out. 

HOW TO COOK VEAL CUTLETS. 

Cut in large pieces of uniform size or leave whole, 
as preferred; sprinkle with salt and pepper; dip in 
beaten egg and dredge with flour. Into a frying pan 
put several large spoonfuls of drippings, and heat 
very hot; lay the cutlets in the hot fat and cook 
until nicely browned on both sides. Remove cutlets, 
add a seasoning of salt and pepper and a large cupful 
of boiling water; return cutlets to this gravy and cover 
closely; set on back of range and steam for one hour 
and a half. This amount of gravy is just enough for 
one cutlet. If not thick enough at serving time, add 
a tiny portion of flour. It should be thick without 
the flour. 



48 



MEATS. 



HOW TO PREPARE SWEETBREADS. 

Soak the sweetbreads in cold, salted water for 
several hours; change the water during that time. 
Put to boil in rapidly boiling, salted water, adding 
a little lemon juice. Simmer the sweetbreads (do 
not boil them) for twenty minutes. Plunge them 
into cold water again to harden ; remove all pipes and 
skin. They are then quite ready to prepare in any 
way. 

FRIED SWEETBREADS. 

Prepare the sweetbreads, add plenty of salt to 
the water in boiling. If large, cut in three slices; if 
small, cut in half. Fry out as many slices of bacon 
as will be needed to serve with sweetbreads ; add some 
drippings. Dip the sweetbreads in diluted egg, then 
in crumbs and fry in the hot fat. Serve with a 
brown sauce and the crisp strips of bacon. Shake 
the crumbs through a fine sieve. This gives a very 
even surface to anything fried. 

CREAMED SWEETBREADS. 

Soak one pair of sweetbreads in cold, salted water 
for several hours; put them to boil in veal or chicken 
stock; simmer for twenty minutes. Take from the 
fire, and when cool enough to handle, remove all 
pipes and skin. Cut in large pieces and make the 
following sauce: 

In a saucepan melt one tablespoonful of butter; 
rub into it one of flour and let it bubble until per- 
fectly smooth; add slowly one large cupful of rich 
cream and continue to stir until the sauce is smooth 
and creamy. Season with a half teaspoonful of salt 
and a dash of pepper; turn in the cut-up sweetbreads 
and heat thoroughly. Serve on toast or in little 
bread cups. 



MEATS. 



49 



TO COOK A FILLET OF BEEF. 

The fillet is the under side of the loin of beef. 
Take the skin and fat from the top, and place strips 
of larding pork over the top. Put in a baking pan 
several pieces of salt pork, and over the pork cut 
slices of onion, turnip, carrot, and a few pieces of 
celery. Lay the fillet upon this bed of vegetables. 
In a cup of brown stock put a half teaspoonful of 
salt, and dust the fillet with pepper. Drop in a sprig 
or two of parsley, and put into a hot oven for thirty 
minutes. When done, remove the fillet and strain 
off the gravy. Skim off as much of the grease as 
possible. Melt a tablespoonful of butter and add to 
it one of flour; rub until smooth. Pour the gravy 
upon this thickening and continue to stir until per- 
fectly smooth and thick. Add a teaspoonful of kitchen 
bouquet to darken the sauce and half a can of mush- 
rooms. Heat the mushrooms thoroughly, but do 
not cook them. If not enough gravy is left in the 
pan after having cooked the fillet, add a little more 
stock. 



50 MEATS. 



Vegetables. 



Wash all vegetables in plenty of cold water. Put 
green vegetables into boiling, salted water to cook, 
and boil uncovered to preserve their color. Winter 
vegetables require longer boiling. 

If canned vegetables are used, turn into a 
colander to drain and let a little cold water from 
the faucet run over them. If treated in this way 
they will never retain any of the taste of the can. 

SOUTHERN RICE. 

Wash the rice through several waters and rub 
between the hands to remove the floury coating. 
This flour holds the grains together in cooking. 
Have a large saucepan of boiling, salted water; put 
it on the hottest part of the stove and wait until it 
begins to boil violently. Throw in the rice slowly 
and let it boil rapidly uncovered for fifteen or twenty 
minutes. Drain off as much water as possible, 
season with a little more salt, and set on the side of 
the range. Cover the saucepan with a thin cloth or 
old napkin and allow it to steam perfectly dry. This 
is a delightful way to serve rice. Each grain will be 
separate. 

RISSOTTO. 

Peel and mince fine one small onion; melt a 
piece of butter the size of an egg in a saucepan, and 
fry the onion in it until it begins to brown ; then turn 
in one breakfast cupful of well-washed rice. Fry it 
for five minutes, watching carefully; add enough 
stock to boil the rice in — about one quart. Season 
with an even teaspoonful of salt and a saltspoonful 
of pepper. When the rice is thoroughly done, put in 
a cupful of grated Parmesan cheese and stir until it 
is- well melted. 

51 



52 



VEGETABLES. 



STUFFED GREEN PEPPERS. 

Take seed from the number of peppers needed 
and soak in weak brine for half an hour. Put on the 
fire in cold water and let come slowly to boiling point 
— boil two minutes (long boiling will toughen the 
peppers). Wash and boil a scant half cupful of rice 
until very tender, and allow to steam dry. Melt two 
tablespoonfuls of butter and fry in it one large onion, 
finely chopped; add to this one-half can of tomatoes, 
and season with salt, pepper, and a dessertspoonful 
of Worcestershire sauce. Turn in the cooked rice 
and let bubble up until thoroughly heated. A little 
finely chopped ham will greatly improve this mix- 
ture. Fill the peppers and sprinkle over each a tiny 
portion of grated cream cheese. Run into the oven 
and heat very hot. Serve with a tomato sauce. 
This amount will fill six medium-sized peppers. 

SPAGHETTI. 

Take about half a box of Italian spaghetti; break 
in small pieces and drop into boiling, salted water; 
boil twenty minutes. Dash in a little cold water and 
let stand for a few minutes to swell ; drain. Turn into 
a double boiler the contents of one can of Campbell's 
tomato soup, add a little salt, cayenne pepper, and a 
dessertspoonful of Worcestershire sauce. Put the 
spaghetti into this mixture and set on back of range to 
slowly boil for one and a half hours. Just before 
serving add a quarter of a pound of cheese, broken 
in pieces, and let it melt thoroughly. Serve with a 
tiny portion of cheese on top. 

STEWED TOMATOES. 

Melt one tablespoonful of butter in saucepan; 
into it put a small onion, chopped very fine. Let 
simmer a few minutes. Add one quart of tomatoes 
and season with one teaspoonful of salt, one table- 
spoonful of sugar, a quarter of a teaspoonful of black 
pepper, and let boil until quite thick. 



VEGETABLES. 



53 



PANNED TOMATOES. 

Butter a baking dish and slice a layer of tomatoes 
into it, a layer of thinly-sliced onions, and buttered 
biscuit on top of onions. Season with salt and pepper 
and a little sprinkling of sugar. Fill the dish in this 
way, and bake until nicely browned in a moderate 
oven. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Select six large, firm tomatoes — do not peel 
them. Cut from the top a thin slice, and with a 
teaspoon remove the inside. Put a tablespoonful of 
butter in a saucepan, add a tablespoonful of chopped 
onion, and cook it a minute. Then add half a cupful 
of finely-chopped chicken, veal, or any left-over meat. 
Season this mixture with salt, cayenne pepper, a 
little chopped parsley, and a teaspoonful of sugar. 
Add the tomato pulp and half a cupful of soft bread 
crumbs. Stir this over the fire until smooth. Fill 
the tomatoes and place in baking dish. Put into the 
oven and bake for twenty minutes. Dot bits of butter 
over the top of each tomato, and serve with the sauce 
in the pan from the tomatoes poured over them. Add 
just a dash of Worcestershire sauce to the liquor in 
the pan. 

STUFFED EGG PLANT. 

Boil an egg plant for twenty minutes, or until 
tender, in boiling, salted water. Cut it in two length- 
wise and remove pulp, being careful to keep the 
shell in shape. Mash the pulp and season with salt 
and pepper. Fry half of an onion finely chopped, 
in a little bacon fat; add a cup of tomatoes, half of 
a small green pepper, chopped fine, and seeds taken 
out; cook until it begins to thicken. Take from the 
fire and add the mashed pulp and one cup of soft 
bread crumbs. Season again with a little more salt, 
a dusting of pepper, and a tablespoonful of butter. 
Add a dash of Worcestershire sauce. Fill the shells, 
covering the tops with crumbs and bits of butter. 
Run into the oven and bake for fifteen or twenty 
minutes. 



54 



VEGETABLES. 



CAULIFLOWER AU GRATIN. 

Let the cauliflower stand upside down in cold, 
salted water for half an hour. Put it into rapidly 
boiling, salted water to cook for twenty minutes, or 
until tender, but do not let it become too tender, as 
it will fall to pieces. Break it into flowerets. Butter a 
pudding dish and fill it with alternate layers of cauli- 
flower, thick, well seasoned cream sauce, and a 
grating of cheese over each layer. Cover the top 
with crumbs and bits of butter; bake until the sauce 
begins to bubble through the crumbs. 

STUFFED IRISH POTATOES. 

Bake smooth potatoes of uniform size until well 
done; turn frequently and bake slowly. When done, 
cut a slice from the side of each and scoop out the 
potato. To six potatoes add one teaspoonful of salt, 
one-quarter of a cupful of butter, a saltspoonful of 
white pepper, and whip thoroughly; then add half 
a cupful of rich milk or cream, and beat until light. 
Fill the potato hulls and let them look a little rough; 
do not smooth them over. Sprinkle with grated cream 
cheese and run into the oven. Bake to a nice brown. 

POTATOES a LA SIMPSON. 

Boil eight Irish potatoes in their jackets; let stand 
until perfectly cold and remove skins. Slice and fry 
in as small a quantity of lard as possible, watching 
carefully and turning with the broad blade of a 
knife. When nicely browned and ready to serve, 
season well with salt, dust with pepper, and add a 
large cupful of rich cream. Let the cream bubble up 
through the potatoes and remove at once from the 
fire. 

POTATOES AU GRATIN O'BRIEN. 

Boil six Irish potatoes (medium size) in their 
jackets until well done; set away to get cold; skin. 
Make a white sauce of two tablespoonfuls of butter 



VEGETABLES. 



55 



and two of flour, two cupfuls of milk, one teaspoonful 
of salt, and one-half teaspoonful of pepper. Cut the 
potatoes into small squares and add one cut-up, 
sweet, red, Mexican pepper (canned). Pour the 
white sauce over and through the potatoes. Put 
into a buttered baking dish with a generous quantity 
of fresh cream cheese grated over the top. Bake until 
nicely browned. 

DIXIE POTATOES. 

Boil three large sweet potatoes until almost 
tender; remove skins and cut in inch slices. Butter 
a baking dish and alternate the layers of potato with 
layers of butter and sugar. Use plenty of butter; 
add half a cup of water and bake slowly, covered, 
until the potatoes absorb the syrup, then uncover 
and brown them nicely. 

SPINACH. 

Look over a peck of spinach and wash through 
four waters; boil in a saucepan without water for 
thirty minutes, closely covered. Drain ; rub through a 
colander. In a skillet put one tablespoonful of butter, 
and when hot add a teaspoonful of finely-chopped 
onion; let the onion turn color and add the spinach. 
Season with salt and pepper, and just before taking 
from the fire put in three tablespoonfuls of rich 
cream. Serve on thin slices of toast with hard- 
boiled egg sliced over the top. 

FRESH PEAS. 

Line a saucepan with freshly washed lettuce leaves 
and turn in the amount of peas wanted; add a very 
little water, as the water adhering to the lettuce 
and that drawn from it by the heat will be sufficient. 
When the peas are tender (twenty minutes), remove 
all lettuce. Reserve all juice, and season with salt 
and pepper, butter and cream. Rub a little flour into 



56 



VEGETABLES. 



the butter before adding to the peas, to thicken the 
sauce a very little, and pour over the peas. Cooked 
in this way, peas are most delicious. 

CORN PUDDING. 

Scrape eight ears of corn; into the yolk of one egg 
rub a tablespoonful of flour; add a large cupful of 
rich milk or cream, a large tablespoonful of butter, 
cut in bits, an even teaspoonful of salt, a table- 
spoonful of sugar, and a dusting of pepper. Add the 
stiffly beaten white last. Bake slowly until nicely 
browned. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Pick over carefully one pint of California pea 
beans; soak over night in cold water; drain off water 
in the morning. Put in stewpan and cover with water, 
and parboil until just soft enough to prick with a 
pin; drain and put in an earthen bean pot. Take 
quarter of a pound of salt pork (fat and lean mixed) 
with rind on top; scrape rind clean and score in strips. 
Bury the pork just below the surface of beans and 
cover all with hot water. Season with a teaspoonful 
of salt, a saltspoonful of pepper, and a tablespoonful 
of molasses. Mix an even saltspoonful of dry mus- 
tard with a tiny portion of water until smooth, and 
add to beans. Put into a slow oven and bake all day, 
keeping the water to cover beans until the last hour. 
Then raise the top of the pork above the beans so 
that it will brown and crisp, and leave the cover of 
pot off. 

SCOTCH HAGGIS. 

1 lb. of oatmeal; 2 silver onions; 

yi lb. of beef suet; 1 tablespoonful of salt. 

Chop the onions and suet very fine; wash the 
oatmeal and mix all together thoroughly; put in 
floured bag and boil two hours. Slice when cold and 
fry in hot lard. This makes a nice breakfast dish. 



VEGETABLES. 



57 



FRIED MUSH. 

To one quart of boiling water add one-half tea- 
spoonful of salt and two-thirds of a cup of " Cream 
of Wheat;" stir it in slowly, put in double boiler and 
boil for three-quarters of an hour. Pour into a square 
pan to harden. When ready for use, slice in pieces of 
uniform size, dip in diluted egg, then into corn- 
meal, and fry in hot lard. 



VEGETABLES. 



Miscellaneous. 



CHICKEN EN CASSEROLE. 

Get two large chickens; clean and cut them for 
frying. Melt and heat two tablespoonfuls of butter 
and two of salt pork drippings in pan, and brown 
the chickens in it. Put into a saucepan two table- 
spoonfuls of butter and rub into it two of flour; 
simmer and stir until smooth. Add one pint of 
stock, two small onions (cut in small pieces), two 
carrots (cut in pieces), one bay leaf, two tablespoon- 
fuls of tomato catsup, and one tablespoonful of 
Worcestershire sauce. Arrange the chicken nicely 
in casserole dish, and pour over it the mixture. Cover 
closely and put in oven for one hour. Half an hour 
before serving add a few cut potato balls, one-half 
pound of fresh mushrooms (braised in butter). 
Fifteen minutes before serving turn in one can of 
peas. Serve from casserole dish. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

1 large chicken ; 1 can of mushrooms ; 

]/2 lb. of bread crumbs; Xyi pints broth; 
% lb. of butter ; 4 eggs ; 

1 teaspoon of grated onion; Pinch of celery salt; 
Tablespoon of pepper ; Large pinch of salt ; 

Tablespoon of chopped parsley. 

Boil the chicken, pick the meat, and grind with 
the mushrooms. Soak the bread crumbs in the broth ; 
add the melted butter, eggs, and seasonings. Mix 
thoroughly and cook in double boiler. Let cool 
(over night if possible), shape; chill, and dip in egg, 
then in crumbs, and fry in deep fat. 

In crumbing allow a tablespoonful of water to an 
egg, and beat just enough to blend the egg. 

— Mrs. W. A. Johnson, Paris, Ky. 
59 



60 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



CREME DE VOLAILLE. 



1 chicken; 

% cup of cream sauce; 
3 eggs; 

Grating of onion ; 
Salt to taste; 



y^. can of mushrooms; 
1 tablespoonful of butter; 
Sprig of parsley; 
Pinch of red and white 
pepper. 



Boil the chicken, pick the meat, and grind through 
a meat grinder; grind the mushrooms; mix all with 
the cream sauce; beat in the butter. Add the eggs 
one at a time, and beat as cake. Season with the 
salt, pepper, onion, and parsley. Put in buttered 
molds and steam one and a half hours. Serve with 
a rich white sauce flavored with sherry wine. 



ANCHOVY TOAST. 



With a large biscuit cutter cut rounds of fresh 
bread about one inch in thickness. Toast a light 
brown, spread with anchovy paste, and place an egg, 
poached soft, upon each round. Sprinkle with salt 
and pepper. Cover with a rich tomato sauce or a 
hot Hollandaise sauce. This is a delicious luncheon 
dish. 

CHICKEN a LA KING. 

1 chicken; 1 lb. of fresh mushrooms; 

\y% large sweet, green 2 canned sweet, red pep- 
peppers ; pers ; 
1 tablespoonful of butter; 1 tablespoonful of flour; 
Yolks of 4 eggs; 2 cupfuls of cream; 
Salt; Pepper; Paprika. 

Boil the chicken until tender; let stand until very 
cold; separate meat from bones and cut into squares. 
Peel and wash the mushrooms; saute in butter until 
tender. Beat the yolks and add to the cream. In a 
double boiler melt the butter, rub into it the flour; 
stir until smooth; add cream and let come to a boil, 
watching carefully so that it does not curdle. Season 
with the salt, pepper, and plenty of paprika. Pour 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



61 



the sauce over the chicken, mushrooms and cut-up 
peppers. Return to the fire and heat for about three 
minutes. Some add sherry or Madeira wine to the 
sauce; it is a matter of taste. If the chicken is a 
large one, more cream will be needed. 

BEEF LOAF. 

\]/2 lbs. of round steak; % lb. of salt pork; 
3 tablespoonfuls of rolled 1 small onion; 

soda crackers; 1}4 teaspoonfuls of salt; 

1 egg; % cup of sweet milk; 

1 teaspoonful of pepper. 

Have the meat chopped by the butcher, then run 
through the meat grinder. To the meat add the 
milk, salt, pepper, chopped onion, and rolled crackers; 
beat in the egg. Form into a loaf, and mold in 
through the center three hard-boiled eggs, that each 
slice of loaf may have a ring of egg in it. Bake 
three hours and baste frequently with butter. 

VEAL LOAF. 

^y 2 lbs. of veal; 3 eggs; 

i/z lb. of pickled pork; 1 tablespoonful of salt; 
1 teaspoonful of black 1 teaspoonful of ground 
pepper; sage; 

Pinch of cayenne. 

Put the veal and pork through the meat grinder. 
Add the eggs (beaten together), salt, pepper, and 
sage. Make into a loaf and bake, covered, for four 
hours, basting often. At the last allow to brown 
nicely. Put just enough water in the pan to keep it 
moist, and baste with butter and water. 

JELLIED VEAL. 

Boil a knuckle of veal in enough water to cover 
it (about two quarts) ; add a large slice of onion, one 
of turnip, one of carrot, a tiny sprig of parsley, and 
three cloves. Boil it very slowly until the meat be- 



62 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



gins to fall from the bones. Take out meat and 
strain liquor through a coarse piece of cheesecloth. 
Return to the fire, season with salt, cayenne pepper, 
and a very little lemon juice. Reduce it to one-half 
the quantity by boiling uncovered. Cut the veal 
in pieces and arrange in bowl or mold. Pour the 
liquor over all, filling the bowl or mold. Set on ice 
or in a cold place to harden. Serve in slices. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

2 tablespoonfuls of but- yi cup of grated cream 

ter ; cheese ; 

2 tablespoonfuls of flour; 1 cup of milk; 
1 level teaspoonful of salt; 1 saltspoonful of paprika; 
4 eggs. 

Melt the butter in a saucepan; rub into it the flour 
and let bubble until cooked, but do not let it brown. 
Beat the yolks of the eggs and add to the milk; turn 
this slowly over the thickening, add cheese and 
seasoning. Continue to stir until the cheese is 
melted and the mixture smooth and thickened, but 
do not let it boil. Take from the fire and allow to 
cool a little. Fold in the stiffly-beaten whites and 
pour into buttered baking dish. Bake twenty min- 
utes over water in oven. Be very careful about open- 
ing the door of the oven, as all souffles fall very 
easily. Send from the oven to the table. When the 
heat is lost the souffle will fall. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Sauces. 



Sauces are easily made if strict attention is given. 
The foundation of many sauces is butter and flour 
cooked together, making a thickening. In making 
this thickening use the same amount of butter and 
flour. Where more butter is required, add it in tiny 
pieces after the other ingredients are mixed with the 
thickening. This will prevent an oily line forming. 

In making sauce, after cooking the thickening, 
draw the saucepan to the cooler part of the stove, 
and add slowly the milk, stock, or cream, stirring 
constantly. It is quite a common custom to rub 
together the butter and flour, and add to the heated 
liquid, but the result is not the same. The flour 
in all sauces must be thoroughly cooked first, to 
take away the pasty taste so often found in cream 
sauce. 

PLAIN CREAM SAUCE. 

1 tablespoonful of butter; 1 tablespoonful of flour; 

saltspoonful of white >2 pint of milk; 
pepper; >2 teaspoonful of salt. 

Melt the butter; rub into it the flour, and let 
bubble until smooth; add the milk, salt, and pepper; 
stir until smooth and creamy. 

DRAWN BUTTER SAUCE. 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 tablespoonful of flour; 

teaspoonful of salt; pint of boiling water; 

Saltspoonful of pepper. 

Melt one tablespoonful of the butter and rub into 
it the flour; when smooth add the boiling water slowly. 
Boil for a minute and take from the fire; add salt 
and pepper and stir in the other spoonful of butter. 
By adding the juice of half a lemon this sauce is 
nice for fish. 

65 



66 



SAUCES. 



FRESH MUSHROOM SAUCE. 

fb. of fresh mushrooms; 2 cupfuls of veal stock; 

2 tablespoonfuls of flour; ]/ 2 teaspoonful of salt; 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter; Dash of cayenne; 

Dash of kitchen bouquet; y 2 teaspoonful of lemon 
1 tablespoonful of cream; juice. 

Pour cold water over the mushrooms to cleanse 
them; drain immediately; peel them, remove and 
scrape stems, and saute in a very little butter until 
tender. Melt the butter, add flour, cook until very 
smooth; add stock and continue to stir until thick- 
ened. Season with salt, pepper, kitchen bouquet, 
and lemon juice; add the cut-up mushrooms and 
cream. Heat thoroughly before serving. 

CANNED MUSHROOM SAUCE. 

1 cupful of brown stock; % cupful of liquor from 
1 tablespoonful of butter; mushrooms; 
1 tablespoonful of flour; 1 can of mushrooms; 
1 teaspoonful of lemon A little chopped parsley, 
juice; 

Melt the butter; add flour and cook until smooth. 
Slowly pour in the liquor from mushrooms and the 
brown stock; season with salt, pepper, and lemon 
juice. Stir until perfectly smooth and thickened; 
add the mushrooms, cut in half, and cook just long 
enough to heat the mushrooms thoroughly. 

TOMATO SAUCE, No. 1. 

y can of tomatoes; 1 large slice of onion; 

^2 bay leaf; 1 tablespoonful of flour; 

1 teaspoonful of sugar; 1 tablespoonful of butter ; 
Dash of Worcestershire teaspoonful of salt; 

sauce; Dusting of cayenne. 

Stew the tomatoes with the bay leaf, sugar, salt, 
pepper, and onion until tender. Melt the butter 
and rub into it the flour; let bubble until well cooked. 
Add the strained tomatoes and season with the 
dash of sauce; stir until perfectly smooth. 



SAUCES. 



67 



TOMATO SAUCE, No. 2. 



yi can of tomatoes; 



1 cupful of brown stock; 



2 tablespoonfuls of flour; 1 teaspoonful of sugar; 
2 tablespoonfuls of butter; }4. teaspoonful of salt; 



Cook the tomatoes with the sugar, salt, pepper, 
and bay leaf about ten minutes, or until quite tender; 
rub through a fine sieve and add the stock. Melt 
the butter, add onion, and let it brown a little; rub 
in the flour and stir until smooth. Pour the strained 
tomato stock over the thickening and continue to 
stir until smooth and quite thick. 



SAUCE FOR SWEETBREADS OR CHICKEN. 

1 tablespoonful of butter; Yolks of 2 eggs; 



1 tablespoonful of flour; Dash of pepper; 
yi cupful of chicken stock; yi teaspoonful of salt; 
4 tablespoonfuls of cream; y^ cupful of milk. 

Melt the butter, rub into it the flour; add the 
milk and chicken stock, and stir until boiling. Beat 
the yolks of the eggs into the cream and stir into 
the hot mixture. Season, reheat, but do not let it 
boil as it will curdle. Use at once. 



Put a tablespoonful of butter into a saucepan 
and, when it bubbles, stir in an even tablespoonful 
of flour. Let it continue to bubble until the flour is 
thoroughly cooked; then stir in half a pint of veal or 
chicken stock. When it boils, take from the fire 
and stir into it gradually the beaten yolks of four 
eggs. Return the sauce to the fire a minute to set 
the eggs, without allowing it to boil. Again remove 
the sauce, stir in the juice of half a lemon and fresh 
butter the size of an English walnut, cut in tiny 
pieces to facilitate its melting, and beat all well 
with a whisk; season with salt and pepper. 




SAUCE HOLLANDAISE. 



68 



SAUCES. 



HOLLANDAISE SAUCE. 

cupful of butter; Yolks of 4 eggs; 

Juice of Yi lemon; % saltspoonful of cay- 

% teaspoonful of salt; enne; 

1 cupful of veal stock. 

Beat the butter to a cream and add the well- 
beaten yolks; beat until light; season with the salt, 
pepper, and lemon juice. Continue beating and 
slowly add the cupful of heated stock. Put into 
double boiler with boiling water and cook, beating 
constantly until the mixture is thick as custard and 
very smooth. Take from the fire and beat for a few 
minutes with a whisk. Serve hot or cold. 

MAITRE D'HOTEL BUTTER. 

X cupful of butter; yi teaspoonful of pepper; 

teaspoonful of salt; >^ tablespoonful of finely- 
i/i tablespoonful of lemon chopped parsley. 

juice; 

Put butter in a bowl and, with a small wooden 
spoon, work until creamy; add salt, pepper, and 
parsley, then lemon juice very slowly. — "The Blue 
Ribbon Cook Book." 

CREAM TOMATO SAUCE. 

pint of strained to- 1 slice of onion ; 

matoes; 1 blade of mace; 

1 tablespoonful of butter; 1 bay leaf; 
1 tablespoonful of flour; y 2 cupful of rich milk; 
Saltspoonful of pepper; y 2 teaspoonful of salt; 
Pinch of soda. 

Add to the strained tomatoes the onion, pinch of 
soda, mace, and bay leaf ; boil gently until reduced 
one-half. Rub together the flour and butter; add to 
the tomatoes; cook for a minute or two. Take 
from the fire and add the heated milk, salt, and 
pepper. Strain and serve. 



SAUCES. 



69 



HORSERADISH SAUCE. 

(For Roast Beef.) 

1 tablespoonful of butter; 1 tablespoonful of flour; 
cupful of milk; % cupful of cream; 

2 tablespoonfuls of grated, prepared horseradish. 

Melt the butter and rub into it the flour; cook 
until smooth; add the cream and milk, and season 
with salt and a dash of cayenne pepper. When thick, 
take from the fire and add the horseradish. If it 
seems too thick, thin with a spoonful of cream. 

CUCUMBER SAUCE FOR FISH. 

4 large cucumbers; 1 small onion; 

1 teaspoonf ul of pepper ; 1 level teaspoonf ul of salt ; 

2 tablespoonfuls of Tarra- 6 tablespoonfuls of 

gon vinegar; whipped cream. 

Pare and grate the cucumbers, taking out all 
seed; drain, and turn the pulp into a bowl; add the 
pepper, salt, and vinegar. At serving time mix in 
the whipped cream lightly. 

BROWN SAUCE FOR MUTTON. 

1 tumbler of currant jelly ; 1 tumbler of tomato catsup ; 
1 cupful of brown sugar 1 tumbler of wine; 
(if sweetness is liked) ; 1 tumbler of brandy. 

When well blended, add one-half pint of mutton 
gravy from which the grease has been skimmed; 
thicken with a tablespoonful of flour, and add a 
taste of pepper, allspice, and cloves. 

MINT SAUCE. 

(For Roast Lamb.) 

Sweeten one-half cupful of cider vinegar with 
two teaspoonf uls of powdered sugar; stand on back 
of stove until thoroughly dissolved. Wash and 
finely chop two tablespoonfuls of mint; pour the 
vinegar over same and let stand until well seasoned, 



70 SAUCES. 



Salads. 



In making salads, place all meat, vegetables, celery, 
or nuts in a dish and cover with three parts olive oil 
and one part lemon juice, with a generous pinch of 
salt. Let it marinate for one and a half or two 
hours. All dressing not absorbed must be drained 
off, the salad mixed, and the dressing to be served 
poured on. 

Wash thoroughly all lettuce; dry by shaking it, 
and tie up in a napkin. Put away in the coolest part 
of the ice box. 

To be good, all salads must be cold, the lettuce 
crisp and dry, or the dressing will not adhere to it. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Select three large, one-year-old hens, a four-pound 
loin of pork with tenderloin; boil in enough water 
to cover all (boiling the pork with the chickens) ; 
season with salt, and add the juice of one large 
lemon. Boil slowly until very tender. Let stand 
until cold, then remove all meat and set away over 
night in a cold place or on ice. This will make 
the meat very firm and aid greatly in cutting. Cut 
in large square pieces. Take the best part of one 
dozen bunches of celery; wash and dry it thoroughly; 
put on ice to become crisp. Cut in pieces. Before 
beginning to make the mayonnaise, marinate all 
meat and celery with a dressing made of three parts 
of olive oil to one of lemon juice, a generous seasoning 
of salt, and a dusting of white pepper. Break the 
yolks of six eggs into a cold bowl, and begin, drop by 
drop, to beat in one quart of olive oil. In a cup mix 
four teaspoonfuls of salt, one teaspoonful of mustard, 
two teaspoonfuls of powdered sugar, one teaspoonful 
of cayenne pepper; add to it four tablespoonfuls of 
Tarragon vinegar and four tablespoonfuls of lemon 

71 



72 



SALADS. 



juice. Mix well, and when the oil mixture begins 
to beat heavily, add a little of the seasoning. If it 
seems too firm to beat well, add a spoonful of rich 
cream. At the last beat in the best part of a pint 
of whipped cream. Do not make the mayonnaise 
too light with cream. Mix with the celery and 
meat, draining from them any of the dressing not 
absorbed before adding the mayonnaise. Sprinkle 
with paprika and pack in ice. If the chickens are 
large, this amount will serve about forty people. 

POTATO SALAD. 

4 large potatoes; 1 small onion; 

1 tablespoonful of parsley; Clove of garlic; 

6 tablespoonfuls of olive 1 level teaspoonful of 
oil ; salt ; 

3 tablespoonfuls of vine- % teaspoonful of pep- 
gar; per; 

Yi cup of mayonnaise dressing. 

Boil the potatoes with skins on, and cut in dice 
when perfectly cold; rub the mixing bowl with the 
garlic. Grate onion and add to the potatoes. Pour 
over all the dressing made of the oil, vinegar, pepper, 
and salt. Set aside for one hour. Pour off at the end 
of that time all dressing not taken up by the potatoes, 
and mix in the mayonnaise. Chop the parsley and 
sprinkle over all; dust with paprika. 

TOMATO JELLY FOR SALAD. 

2 cups tomatoes; 3 cloves; 

1 bay leaf; 1 slice of onion; 

yi teaspoonful of thyme; 1 teaspoonful of salt; 
1 teaspoonful of pepper; box Cox gelatine; 

teaspoonful of sugar; % cup of cold water. 

Soak the gelatine in the water. Boil together the 
tomatoes, cloves, onions, salt, bay leaf, thyme, 
sugar, and pepper; strain through a fine sieve, and if 
a clear jelly is wanted, let it drip through a cheese- 
cloth bag. Add the strained geiatine and set aside 
to congeal. Serve with mayonnaise and lettuce. 



SALADS. 



73 



CUCUMBER JELLY FOR COLD MEATS. 

4 large cucumbers ; % box of gelatine ; 

4 tablespoonfuls of vine- }i cup of water; 

gar; Dash of cayenne; 

yi teaspoonful of salt; 1 teaspoonful of grated 

onion. 

Grate the cucumbers after peeling and removing 
all seeds. Cover gelatine with the water and soak 
one-half hour. Then add two extra tablespoonfuls 
of water and the vinegar. Stand this in hot water 
until all the gelatine is melted. Add salt, cucumbers, 
onion, and pepper. Turn into a mold and set on ice. 
Slice and serve with French dressing. 

PERFECTION SALAD. 



yi box of Knox gelatine; 
1 pint of boiling water; 
1 cup of finely-chopped 
celery ; 

1 cupful of finely-chopped 

cabbage ; 

2 sweet, red Mexican pep- 

pers, chopped fine ; 



]4. cupful of cold water; 
2 green peppers, finely 

chopped ; 
1 teaspoonful of salt; 

cupful of sugar; 
yi cupful of lemon juice; 
yi cupful of mild vine- 
gar. 



Soak the gelatine in the cold water for fifteen 
minutes; add the boiling water and stir until dis- 
solved. Put in vinegar and lemon juice, salt, sugar, 
and pour the mixture over all other ingredients. 
Continue stirring until it begins to congeal; pour 
into small custard cups and set on ice to harden. 
Serve with lettuce and mayonnaise dressing. If 
preferred, mold the salad in one large mold and slice. 

ENDIVE SALAD. 

Mix equal parts of crisp lettuce and endive. 
Put a piece of Roquefort cheese the size of an English 
walnut in a bowl; mash it and rub it smooth with 
one tablespoonful of olive oil. Beat this into a small 
cupful of French dressing, and add to it a teaspoon- 
ful of Worcestershire sauce. Dress the lettuce and 
endive with it, and put on ice until ready to serve. 



74 



SALADS. 



MACEDOINE SALAD. 

Use peas, string beans, cauliflower, and beets. 
Boil each separately. Separate the cauliflower into 
flowerets; cut the beans in half, and beets into small 
squares. When perfectly cold, marinate all. Before 
serving, pour off any dressing not taken up by the 
vegetables and mix with mayonnaise. This salad, 
if well put together, will be most attractive looking. 
Make small cups of the lettuce leaves, place a spoon- 
ful of each vegetable into each little cup, reserving 
the cauliflower for the center. Do not mix the may- 
onnaise with it, but serve it with the salad. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

Peel the cucumbers, and put in water with a 
piece of ice in the water. Do not add salt- — it only 
serves to toughen the cucumbers. Arrange lettuce 
on a flat dish and dress with French dressing. Slice 
the cucumbers over the lettuce and add dressing 
to them. 

DRESSING FOR FRUIT SALAD. 

3 tablespoonfuls of vine- 4 eggs; 

gar ; 1 pint of cream ; 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter; 1 tablespoonful of sugar; 

teaspoonf ul of mustard ; Dash of cayenne pepper. 

Beat the eggs together. Mix the mustard with 
the sugar; add the vinegar, butter, and beaten eggs. 
Put into double boiler and let thicken, but do not 
boil, stirring constantly. When cool add the cayenne 
pepper and the cream, whipped. 

Malaga and Tokay grapes, with cut-up pecans, 
make a delicious salad with this dressing. 

SWEETBREAD SALAD. 

Parboil three pairs of sweetbreads. When cold, 
cut in large pieces and marinate. Let them stand 
for one hour in a cool place, then pour off any of 



SALADS. 



75 



the dressing not absorbed by the sweetbreads. 
Add enough of the mayonnaise to seemingly cover 
each piece of meat. Mix thoroughly and put on ice 
or pack in ice. This amount will serve twelve people 
if the sweetbreads are large. It is a matter of taste 
about the addition of celery — more economical but 
not so good. In serving, sprinkle each portion with 
paprika. 

SPANISH SALAD. 

Shred the half of a firm cabbage very fine. Take 
all the seeds from two large, green peppers, and 
pour over all cold water and add a large piece of ice. 
Let stand one hour to become crisp. Drain all well 
and mix with the following 

Dressing. 

yi teaspoonful of mustard ; 1 teaspoonful of salt; 

1 tablespoonful of sugar; 1 egg, slightly beaten; 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter % cup of vinegar, added 

(melted); last; 

yi cup of cream. 

Cook in double boiler until it thickens. Let the 
dressing stand until quite cold, and add one-quarter 
of a cupful of olive oil. 



76 SALADS. 



Salad Dressings. 



MAYONNAISE. 

Yolks of 2 raw eggs; 1 tablespoonful of lemon 

1 teaspoonful of salt; juice; 

teaspoonful of powdered )4 teaspoonful of mus- 
sugar ; tard ; 

1 tablespoonful of Tarra- % teaspoonful of cay- 
gon vinegar; enne pepper; 

1 cup of olive oil. 
Break the yolks into a bowl; gradually beat into 
them the oil; in a cup mix the sugar, salt, pepper, 
mustard, vinegar, and lemon juice. Stir until dis- 
solved, and add to the oil mixture; continue stirring 
until perfectly smooth and creamy; thin with a tiny 
portion of rich cream. A little onion grated will 
greatly improve the mayonnaise, if you like it. 

PARSLEY MAYONNAISE. 

1 tablespoonful of 3 or 4 drops of lemon 

chopped parsley; juice. 
1 cup of mayonnaise. 
Add the lemon to parsley to start the juice, and 
chop fine. Beat into the mayonnaise. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

3 tablespoonfuls of olive teaspoonful of salt; 

oil; teaspoonful of mus- 

1 tablespoonful of lemon tard; 

juice or vinegar; % teaspoonful of cayenne 

% teaspoonful of sugar; pepper; 

A grating of onion. 
Into a cup put the mustard, salt, sugar, and 
pepper, and dissolve with the lemon juice or vinegar. 
Beat the dissolved mixture into the olive oil, and 
add the grating of onion. Keep on ice or in a cool 
place until ready for use. 

77 



78 SALAD DRESSINGS. 



TARTARE SAUCE. 

To a cupful of mayonnaise add one teaspoonful of 
onion juice, a tablespoonful of chopped capers and 
one tablespoonful of cucumber pickle chopped fine. 

— Mrs. John G. Carlisle. 

SAUCE VINAIGRETTE. 

6 tablespoonfuls of 3 tablespoonfuls of Tarragon 
olive oil; vinegar or lemon juice; 

yi tesapoonful of 1 teaspoonful of salt; 

paprika; Dash of cayenne; 

1 tablespoonful of 1 tablespoonful of chopped 
parsley ; chives. 

Have bowl very cold, and add a small piece of 
ice; put in salt, pepper, and add slowly the oil, stirring 
rapidly. When thick, remove the ice and add the 
vinegar, or lemon juice, chives, and parsley. Use at 
once. 

COOKED SALAD DRESSING. 

teaspoonful of mustard ; cupful of cream ; 

1 teaspoonful of salt; % cupful of vinegar; 

1 tablespoonful of sugar; 2 tablespoonfuls of 
1 egg (slightly beaten) ; melted butter. 

Mix all, being careful to add the vinegar last. 
Cook in double boiler until thick like custard. — Mrs. 
W. A. Johnson, Paris, Ky. 



Pickles— Catsups— Sauces. 



THE BRINE. 

In making brine, use a heaping pint of coarse salt 
to a gallon of water. Keep the cucumbers well under, 
and test frequently. They should be of a pleasant 
saltness. 

Use the best cider vinegar, unless the recipe calls 
for white wine vinegar. As heating weakens it, 
vinegar should be very strong, and should only be 
brought to boiling point and immediately used. 

SLICED CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Get about four dozen medium-sized cucumbers. 
Peel and cut in thick pieces. Cover with boiling 
water and add a good seasoning of salt. Allow the 
cucumbers to remain in the water until nearly cold. 
Remove each piece and dry with a cloth. 

In a large pan of cold water put one tablespoonful 
of powdered alum. Into this drop the cucumbers. 
Let stand for three hours. Make them out of this 
alum water without rinsing them. To one-half 
gallon of cider vinegar, add one and a half pounds of 
dark-brown sugar, five cents' worth of celery seed, 
the same of white mustard seed, and ten cents' worth 
of cinnamon bark; a few pieces of red pepper and a 
full pint of sliced, silver onions. Bring all to boiling 
point and set aside to cool. Pour over the sliced 
cucumbers and tie up securely. 

If unable to secure your cucumbers in season, 
this recipe is very good made of Dill pickles. Get the 
same number from the grocery and begin by putting 
the pickles into cold water with the alum in it. Let 
stand for several hours and make up in the same way. 
It is not necessary to peel the Dills — cut them in thick 
pieces just the same. 

79 



80 PICKLES— CATSUPS— SAUCES. 



CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Get cucumbers a little larger than your little 
finger. Put into brine for twenty-four hours; taste, 
and if not salty enough, let them remain twelve 
hours longer. Take from the brine and put into clear, 
cold water. It is a good plan to place the pan con- 
taining the cucumbers in the sink, and let the water 
run over them all night. If this is not convenient, 
change the water several times. In the morning, line 
a large pan or kettle with grape leaves (to green the 
cucumbers), fill with water in which you have dis- 
solved a large kitchen spoonful of powdered alum. 
Allow one spoonful to about three hundred cucum- 
bers. Put in the cucumbers and let stand until 
noon (three or four hours). Make them out of this 
alum water without rinsing them. To a gallon jar, 
add the following spices: 

10 small red peppers (cut in pieces); 

15 cents worth of white mustard seed; 

5 cents worth of celery seed; 

5 cents worth of cinnamon bark; 

5 cents worth of horseradish root (cut in strips) ; 

4 divisions of garlic (sliced). 

Pack the cucumbers in jar with alternate layers 
of spices. Make a half gallon of white wine vinegar 
very sweet with granulated sugar (about 1>£ pints). 
Heat to boiling point and pour over the cucumbers 
in jar. Tie up while hot, and let stand several days, 
then uncover to see if the pickles are well under the 
vinegar. If not, add a little more sweetened vinegar. 

— Sallie B. Henderson. 

CUCUMBER RELISH. 

1 gallon of cucumbers ; 1 quart of onions ; 

1 quart of cider vinegar ; Salt ; 
Pepper; Sugar. 

Peel the cucumbers, split in half, take out all the 
middle, and chop. Chop the onions; salt all well and 
let drain. Put all together, add the vinegar, pepper 



PICKLES— CATSUPS— SAUCES. 81 



and sugar to taste, and boil just long enough to keep 
it through the winter, that the fresh taste of the 
cucumbers may be retained. 

MUSTARD PICKLE. 

1 quart of small cucum- 1 quart of green toma- 
bers; toes (sliced) ; 

1 quart of large cucum- 1 quart of seed onions; 

bers (sliced) ; 4 green peppers (chopped 

1 large cauliflower, di- fine), 
vided into flowerets. 

Make a brine of four quarts of water to one pint 
of salt. Pour over all and let soak for twenty-four 
hours; then heat just enough to scald it and turn into 
colander to drain. Mix one cup of flour, six table- 
spoonfuls of mustard, 1 tablespoonful of turmeric, 
and one teaspoonful of powdered alum with enough 
cold vinegar to make a smooth paste; add one cup 
of sugar and sufficient vinegar to make two quarts in 
all. Boil this mixture until it thickens and is quite 
smooth, stirring all the time; then add vegetables 
and cook until well heated through. Beans may be 
added if wanted. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. 

1 peck of green tomatoes; 2 quarts of silver onions; 

2 lbs. of brown sugar; ^ lb. of white mustard 
1 tablespoonful of celery seed; 

seed; yi tablespoonful of Cole- 

1 tablespoonful of pow- man's mustard. 

dered cloves; y£ teaspoonful of tur- 

meric. 

Slice the tomatoes and onions; sprinkle well with 
salt and let stand over night. In the morning pour 
cold water over them and wash all salt from them. 
Squeeze as dry as possible. Cover well with vinegar 
and boil until tender; then drain. Put into the same 
amount of fresh vinegar two pounds of brown sugar, 
one-half pound of white mustard seed, one tablespoon- 
ful of celery seed, and one tablespoonful of powdered 



82 PICKLES— CATSUPS— SAUCES. 



cloves. Let boil for five minutes. To the tomatoes 
and onions add a good sprinkling of cayenne pepper 
and a half tablespoonful of Coleman's mustard, and 
a half teaspoonful of turmeric. Pour the boiled mix- 
ture over the drained tomatoes, and mix thoroughly. 
Let cool before packing away. A small bottle of salad 
oil added to this recipe, when cool, makes it deli- 
cious. It is a matter of taste. 



PEPPER HASH. 



3 dozen sweet peppers ; 
6 large onions; 
5 cents of celery seed ; 
1^2 pints of vinegar; 



1 head of cabbage; 
1 red pepper pod ; 
5 cents of mustard seed; 
\}4 cups of granulated 
sugar. 



Chop the peppers, onions, and cabbage fine; 
sprinkle a cup of salt over all and let stand over 
night. Squeeze out of brine, add the sugar and 
spices. Bring vinegar to boiling point and pour 
over all. Seal. 



CHOW-CHOW. 



2 dozen cucumbers; 

1 peck of green tomatoes; 

1 dozen green peppers; 

3 ounces of mustard seed ; 

2 ounces of celery seed ; 

3 ounces of turmeric; 



2 heads cabbage; 

1 peck of seed onions; 
24 of a box of Coleman's 
mustard ; 

3 lbs. of brown sugar; 

6 small red peppers 
(seed and all). 



Cut the cucumbers in chunks and do not peel. 
Chop the cabbage fine. Quarter and slice the green 
tomatoes, but do not peel. Sprinkle all with salt and 
let stand over night. Take seed from the green 
peppers and chop fine. Take off outside skin of 
onions and use whole. Soak onions and peppers 
over night in salt water (separately) ; drain, and put 
in kettle with alternate layers of seasoning. Mix the 
mustard with vinegar (a small quantity) until quite 



PICKLES— CATSUPS— SAUCES. 83 



smooth. Cover the whole with good cider vinegar 
and boil a good thirty minutes. Taste, and if not 
salty enough, add a little more. This will make 
thirteen (13) large quarts. — Louisville. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

24 tomatoes; 6 tablespoons salt (not 

4 large onions ; heaping) ; 

8 green peppers; 1 dessertspoon cloves; 

1 grated nutmeg; 1 dessertspoon ginger; 

8 coffee cups cider vinegar ; 1 dessertspoon cinnamon ; 

8 tablespoons brown sugar; 1 teaspoon celery seed. 

Peel and chop the tomatoes; skin and chop the 
onions. Take seed from green peppers and chop. 
Add the spices, cover with the vinegar, and boil 
until very thick. Just before taking from the fire, add 
the celery seed. This quantity will make five (5) 
pints. This sauce can be made with canned to- 
matoes very nicely, if you happen to need it in the 
winter when the fresh ones are not obtainable. In 
this case do not use quite as much salt, and about 
seven cups of vinegar. Use four quart cans of to- 
matoes to the full recipe. 



PEPPER SAUCE. 



1 dozen green peppers; 
15 large onions; 

2 cups of sugar; 

Dash of cayenne pepper; 



1 dozen sweet red pep- 
pers; 

1 pint of vinegar; 

2 teaspoonfuls of salt. 



Take seeds from peppers, and with onions put 
through the meat grinder. Pour boiling water over 
all and let scald. Drain and scald with hot vinegar. 
Drain from the vinegar and add one pint of cold 
vinegar, sugar, salt, and cayenne pepper. Let boil 
up and bottle while hot. 



84 PICKLES— CATSUPS— SAUCES. 



TOMATO CATSUP. 

bushel of tomatoes ; 4 ounces of salt ; 

3 ounces of ground black ^> ounce of ground 

pepper ; cloves ; 

1 ounce of cinnamon; 1 gallon of cider vinegar; 

1 teaspoonful of cayenne 1 cup of sugar; 

pepper; 4 onions. 

Skin the tomatoes and slice them. Peel the 
onions; slice, and add to the tomatoes; boil until 
very soft and rub through a sieve fine enough to 
retain the seeds. Return to the fire and boil to the 
consistency of thick jam, stirring and watching care- 
fully. To the vinegar add a large cupful of sugar 
and the spices. Add to the tomato pulp and let boil 
up twice. Let cool, and bottle. 

CHUTNEY SAUCE. 

4 ounces of salt ; 1 ounce of mustard seed ; 
y 2 ounce of best red pepper ; 2 ounces of peeled garlic ; 
y ounce of ginger ; 8 ounces of brown sugar ; 
8 ounces of seeded raisins; 12 good, sour apples. 

Pare and chop the apples very fine; add all to- 
gether, cover with one quart of vinegar and boil 
about two hours, or until thick like jam. 

SLICED CUCUMBER RELISH. 

15 cucumbers (not large) ; 1 quart of silver onions. 

Peel and slice all; sprinkle with salt and let stand 
over night. Drain, pour over all enough vinegar to 
cover well. Measure the vinegar — to two quarts of 
vinegar, add one tablespoonful turmeric and one 
bunch of small red peppers, cut in pieces. Scald 
vinegar, put in turmeric and peppers; pour over 
cucumbers and onions, and tie up closely. Sugar may 
be added to this recipe if a little sweetness is pre- 
ferred. 



/ 



PICKLES— CATSUPS— SAUCES. 85 



PICKLED PEACHES. 

1 gallon of cider vinegar; 7 lbs. of peaches; 

4 lbs. of brown sugar. 

Wash and peel the peaches; stick into each peach 
four cloves and pack down in a jar. As the jar is 
being filled, throw in a handful (or one ounce) of stick 
cinnamon. Let the sugar and vinegar come to a 
boil, pour over the fruit, and let stand ten days. 
Pour off the vinegar, bring to boiling point, and 
pour over the fruit again. 

SWEET PEAR PICKLE. 



7 lbs. of fruit; 

1 teaspoonful of ground 

cloves ; 

2 teaspoonfuls of ground 

allspice ; 

2 teaspoonfuls 



4 lbs. of brown sugar; 
Yi teaspoonful of mace 
(if liked) ; 
ounce of ginger root; 
Vinegar ; 
of ground cinnamon. 



Get the little Seckel pears; look them over 
carefully and select only the perfect ones, leaving 
the little stems on. Peel them; boil in clear water 
until very tender. Mix the spices and divide into 
three parts — tie up in little muslin bags. Put on 
as much vinegar as you think will cover the fruit 
(about one gallon) with the sugar. Drop in the 
little spice bags and bring to boiling point. Pack 
the pears in a stone jar and pour over them, the 
boiling vinegar. Each morning, for six mornings, 
return the vinegar to the fire, and pour over the pears 
the boiling vinegar. At the end of this time it will be 
very thick and quite ready for use. 



7 



PICKLES— CATSUPS— SAUCES. 



Desserts. 



In making paste for pies, handle as little as possible. 
Make up several hours before needed; roll in a nap- 
kin, and put in a pan on the ice. 

In making cream desserts, be careful to notice 
which the recipe calls for, a pint of cream whipped or 
a pint of whipped cream. It will make enough differ- 
ence to completely spoil the dessert. See that all 
gelatine is well dissolved before adding to any mix- 
ture. 

In making custards, beat the eggs a very little, 
just enough to blend them, as you want the eggs to 
thicken the milk. If you wish to lighten with eggs, 
as in cake, beat them thoroughly. 

The scalding of milk and cream makes a very 
smooth mixture for all desserts. 

PLAIN PASTRY FOR PIES. 

1 large cup of lard; 3 cups of sifted flour; 

Yi teaspoonful of salt. 

Add the salt to the flour; cut the lard with a knife 
into the flour. Moisten with enough ice water to 
make a moderately stiff dough. With the blade of 
the knife pat the paste together; handle as little as 
possible. After rolling out the paste, spread with 
butter, fold and roll again. For top crust, roll out, 
butter, and fold three times. Put on ice until ready 
for use. 

TRANSPARENT PUDDING. 



2 cups of sugar; 
2 tablespoonfuls of flour; 
1 teaspoonful of vanilla; 
1 cup of cream; 



1 cup of jelly or pre- 
serves ; 
1 cup of butter; 
4 eggs. 



Cream the butter and sugar together; add the 
flour and cream. Beat the eggs separately; add the 

87 



88 



DESSERTS. 



yolks to the mixture and beat hard. Put in vanilla 
and jelly or preserves. Add the beaten whites last, 
and bake in a rich under-crust in a moderate oven. 
This will make two puddings. 

LEMON PIE, No. 1. 

1 cup of sugar; 1 lemon (juice and rind) 

4 city butter crackers 1 cup of cream; 

(rolled fine) ; 1 tablespoonful of butter; 

2 eggs. 

Line a pie-pan with paste, and bake just a little 
before turning in the filling. Use the whites for 
meringue ; bake slowly. This will make one pie. 

LEMON PIE, No. 2. 

1 cup of sugar; 1 cup of cream; 

2 eggs; 2 lemons; 

1 tablespoonful of flour; X CU P of butter. 

Line a pie-pan with paste and bake it a very little. 
Cream the butter; add the sugar and flour, the beaten 
yolks and cream. Cook in double boiler until thick 
like custard; add the lemon juice; pour into crust and 
bake to a light brown. Make a meringue of the 
whites, and return to the oven to brown it. This 
will make one large pie or two small ones. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

2 tablespoonfuls of 1 cup of sugar; 

chocolate; 1 tablespoonful of flour; 

2 eggs; % cupful of butter; 

1 cup of milk. 

Cream the butter; mix the flour with the sugar, 
and add to butter; stir in the eggs and the milk 
beaten together; add the chocolate and put into 
double boiler. Cook to the consistency of custard, 
and pour into a rich, thin crust. Bake until done. 



DESSERTS. 



89 



PUMPKIN PIE. 



of 



of 



2 cupfuls of pumpkin 

pulp; 
1^2 cupfuls of milk; 
1 even teaspoonful of salt; 
1 even teaspoonful of 

ginger ; 

teaspoonful of 
allspice ; 

Peel and cut the pumpkin in pieces; cover it 
closely and cook slowly until tender. Remove cover 
and dry the pulp, watching carefully that it does not 
stick and burn. Put it through a coarse sieve; add 
the beaten eggs last and two tablespoonfuls of whisky. 
Bake in under crust only, and allow from forty-five 
to fifty minutes for the baking. 



1 tablespoonful of butter 

(melted) ; 

2 eggs; 

1 large cup of sugar ; 
1 even teaspoonful 

cinnamon ; 
1 tablespoonf ul 

molasses. 



MOLASSES PIE. 

1 cup of New Orleans yi teaspoonful of vanilla; 

molasses; 1 cup of sugar; 

4 eggs ; 1 tablespoonful of butter. 

Cream the butter; add sugar and molasses, the 
beaten yolks, vanilla, and the stiffly beaten whites 
last. Bake in under crust only. 



COCOANUT PIE. 

1 tablespoonful of butter; 4 eggs; 

2 cups of cream; 2 cups of sugar; 

1 teaspoonful of lemon 4 cups of grated cocoa- 
extract; nut; 

1 tablespoonful of flour. 

Beat the yolks of the eggs with the sugar mixed 
with the flour; add the cream, butter and cocoanut. 
Flavor with the lemon and stir in the beaten whites. 
Bake in under crust only. Allow plenty of time for 
the baking, and let it thicken slowly and brown 
nicely. This will make two large pies. 



90 



DESSERTS. 



JELLY PIE, No. 1. 

4 eggs (beaten separately) ; 1 tablespoonful of flour ; 
1 glass of jelly (plum \ x / 2 cups of sugar; 

jelly best) ; 1 tablespoonful of butter. 

Mix the butter and sugar together ; then flour, then 
the jelly, then the egg. Beat well, fill pastry, and 
bake. — "The Blue Ribbon Cook Book." 



JELLY PIE, No. 2. 

2 eggs; 1 cup of sugar; 

]/ 2 cup of cream ; ]/$ cup of butter ; 

]/ 2 cup of jelly; Dash of vanilla: 

1 even tablespoonful of flour. 

Beat sugar, butter, yolk of eggs, and jelly together; 
then add beaten whites; flavor and bake in under 
crust. This recipe will make one pie. 



CARAMEL PIE. 

y cup of butter ; Dash of vanilla ; 

1 cup of cream; 2 cups of brown sugar; 

4 eggs; 2 tablespoonfuls of flour. 

Line a deep pie-pan with rich pastry ; mix the flour 
with the sugar. Cream the butter; add sugar and 
cream, and the beaten yolks. Flavor with the vanilla; 
Make a meringue of the whites for the top of the 
pie. Bake slowly. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON PIE. 

1 cup of granulated sugar; 1 cup of flour; 
Juice of 1 orange; 4 eggs; 

1 teaspoonful of baking 1 cup of grated cocoanut. 
powder; 

Cream Filling. 

1 pint of milk; y saltspoonful of salt; 

3 tablespoonfuls of sugar; 2 eggs; 

1 teaspoonful of flour; y teaspoonful of vanilla. 



DESSERTS. 



91 



In making the cake part, sift the baking powder 
with the flour; squeeze the orange juice over the 
sugar; add the beaten yolks, then flour, and last the 
beaten whites. For the cream filling, scald the milk 
in double boiler, pour it over the beaten eggs and 
sugar (adding the flour and salt to the sugar). Re- 
turn to double boiler and stir constantly until a 
coating is formed on the spoon, but do not boil. 
Let cool; split cake when cold and spread with a 
thick layer of the filling, and cover with half a cupful 
of grated cocoanut. On top spread with powdered 
sugar and cocoanut. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

6 eggs; 1 cup of butter; 

6 heaping tablespoonfuls 1 wineglass of brandy or 

of sugar; whisky; 
1 nutmeg; 1 wineglass of wine; 

1 pint of cooked apples. 

Line a deep pan with rich pastry; cream the butter, 
add sugar and beaten yolks, then brandy, wine, nut- 
meg, and apples (which have been rubbed through a 
sieve). Make a meringue of the whites, and return 
pudding to oven just long enough to brown nicely. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

Make a very rich biscuit dough. Roll about 
one-half inch thick and put in shallow, round pan; 
brush the top with butter and place another layer 
on top. Bake as biscuit. Wash and cap one quart of 
berries, reserving largest for top. Mix with one-half 
cup of sugar and chop a little with a sharp knife. 
Separate the layers and spread with the fruit. Re- 
place top layer and garnish with the whole berries. 
Make a hard sauce of one-quarter of a cup of butter 
beaten to a cream ; add one-half cup of sugar and beat 
until light; then add a tablespoonful of rich cream, 
and with a teaspoon put dots of sauce over the entire 
top. Serve at once. 



92 



DESSERTS. 



BOURBON PUDDING. 

4 eggs; \yi cups of sugar; 

y$ cup of butter; 8 tablespoonfuls of bour- 

2 tablespoonfuls of flour; bon whisky; 

1 cup of milk. 

Reserve the whites for meringue ; cream the butter 
and sugar; add the beaten yolks, then flour and milk. 
Flavor with the whisky and bake in under crust. 
To the beaten whites add four tablespoonfuls of 
sugar and brown in oven. This recipe will make two 
pies. 

BELLEVUE PUDDING. 

1 cup of New Orleans Pinch of salt; 

molasses; cup of butter; 

2 cups of sifted flour; 1 cup of sweet milk; 

1 teaspoonful of soda; 1 teaspoonful of cinnamon; 
1 teaspoonful of cloves. 

Steam three hours and use with the following 

sauce : 

Vanilla Sauce. 

1 cup of pulverized sugar; }4 cup of butter; 

1 egg; 1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 

Beat the egg; add the butter and sugar (which 
have been creamed together), then the vanilla, and 
let boil until thick. Just at serving time add two 
tablespoonfuls of boiling water. 

QUEEN'S PUDDING. 

Butter a quart pudding dish; cut thin slices of 
bread and spread with plenty of butter. Arrange in 
alternate layers of buttered bread and thinly sliced 
apples seasoned with sugar and nutmeg and a little 
of the yellow peel of the lemon. Save the apple 
peelings for the top and fill the dish very full. Add 
one-quarter of a cup of cold water to start the juice 
of the apples. Serve warm with a rich boiled custard 
sauce, made as follows: Scald one-half pint of new 



DESSERTS. 



93 



milk; beat two eggs with half a cup of sugar; pour 
the milk over the egg mixture. Return to double 
boiler and stir until thick and smooth. Flavor with 
a few drops of vanilla. 

BROWN BETTY. 

Butter a large pudding dish. Arrange alternate 
layers of thinly-sliced sour apples and bread crumbs; 
season each layer with a generous sprinkling of gran- 
ulated sugar, bits of butter, a pinch of cinnamon, 
cloves, and allspice. Cover the top with plenty of 
crumbs and dot bits of butter here and there. Make 
a syrup of one cup of dark-brown sugar and half a 
cup of water; pour this around the sides of the dish, 
and not over the crumbs. Bake in a moderate oven 
for forty-five minutes. Serve with a sweet sauce, or 
sweet cream if much sweetness is not liked. 

TAPIOGA PUDDING. 

3 tablespoonfuls of tapi- 1 quart of milk; 

oca ; 1 cup of sugar ; 

4 eggs ; yi teaspoonf ul of vanilla. 

Soak the tapioca over night; put it into the boil- 
ing milk; beat the yolks of the eggs with the sugar 
and add to the boiling mixture; boil for fifteen min- 
utes. Turn into a pudding dish and spread the top 
with a meringue made of the white of the eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth with four tablespoonfuls of sugar. 
Brown in the oven and eat with sweetened cream. 

CORN MEAL PUDDING. 

1 pint of sifted meal; % pound of butter; 

1 pint of sweet milk; 4 eggs; 

1 tumbler of molasses; % teaspoonf ul of soda. 

Boil the milk. While hot pour it over the meal 
and mix well. Warm the butter and add to meal. 
Stir the soda dissolved in a tiny bit of hot water into 
the molasses; beat the eggs separately and add when 



94 



DESSERTS. 



the mush is cold. Mix all well and bake in buttered 
dish; eat with sauce. A sauce made of maple sugar 
is delicious with this pudding. — J. H. C. 

COLD CUSTARD RICE. 

Wash three tablespoonfuls of rice and put to boil 
in one pint of rich milk, with a pinch of salt in double 
boiler. Scald a pint of milk; beat two eggs together 
with three-quarters of a cupful of granulated sugar 
with an even tablespoonful of flour stirred into the 
sugar; pour the scalded milk over the eggs and sugar, 
and return to the double boiler. Continue stirring 
until the mixture is quite smooth and thick, but do 
not allow it to boil; flavor with vanilla: set aside to 
cool. Let the rice cool a little; stir the rice into the 
custard and pour into custard cups. It will become 
quite firm. At serving time add a grated macaroon 
over the top of each. 

GLORIFIED RICE. 

3 tablespoons rice; 1 pint of milk; 

\y 2 tablespoons gelatine. 1 quart of whipped 
flavored with vanilla : cream ; 

1 cup sugar (scant). 

Wash the rice and put to boil in double boiler 
with milk and a tiny pinch of salt: boil one and a 
half hours; let cool, sweeten, and flavor. Dissolve 
the gelatine in a small portion of cold water and add 
a tiny bit of boiling water. Let cool : add to rice and 
watch carefully until it begins to congeal; then whip 
in lightly one quart of well drained, whipped cream. 
Pack in ice or set on ice to harden. Serve with any 
kind of tart jelly or preserves. 

RICE PUDDING. 

4 tablespoonfuls of rice: Milk and cream; 

Yi teaspoonful of salt; x /2 cup of stoned rai- 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla : sins : 

4 tablespoonfuls of sugar. 



DESSERTS. 



95 



Into a pudding dish holding a quart put the rice, 
which has been well washed and soaked; fill the dish 
with milk and cream and add the salt. Put into the 
oven to cook for about half an hour; add the sugar, 
vanilla, and raisins, and return to the oven and cook 
slowly for two hours or more, if necessary. If the 
milk boils down, lift the skin at the side and add a 
little more hot cream. To make the pudding creamy 
it must be cooked very slowly and plenty of cream 
used. Just before serving spread thickly over the 
top fresh marshmallows ; put in the oven just long 
enough for the marshmallows to swell. Serve with 
whipped cream or plain cream. Garnish with candied 
cherries or red jelly. — "The Blue Ribbon Cook 
Book." 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Use a quart pudding dish, and fill about two- 
thirds full with quartered apples; add enough sugar 
to sweeten and two teaspoonfuls of lemon juice, 
one-half teaspoonful of nutmeg and cinnamon mixed. 
Cook in oven until apples are soft. Sift together: 

\yi cups of flour; level teaspoonfuls of 

% teaspoonful of salt; baking powder; 

2 teaspoonfuls of sugar. 

Work in three tablespoonfuls of butter with the 
fingers and mix in one-half cup of milk. Roll out the 
pastry the size of the pudding dish and place on top 
of apple; bake under cover about twenty minutes. 
Serve with the following sauce: 

1 cup of boiling water; 2 tablespoonfuls of corn 
cup of sugar ; starch ; 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 

Flavor with vanilla or lemon extract. When ready 
to serve run a knife around the edge of pudding and 
turn it out. 



96 



DESSERTS. 



PEACH BAVARIAN CREAM. 

18 peaches; y 2 lb. of sugar; 

% box of gelatine (Cox) ; 1 glass of rich cream ; 
1 pint of whipped cream. 

Peel and cut the peaches; boil with the sugar and 
squeeze through a fine sieve. Add the dissolved gel- 
atine and glass of cream. When about to set, stir 
until smooth and add the whipped cream. Set on ice 
to congeal. 

BAVARIAN CREAM. 



1 pint of milk; 
4 eggs;_ 

% vanilla bean ; 

box of gelatine (Cox) ; 



1 quart of whipped 

cream ; 
1 cup of sugar; 
Pinch of salt. 



Scald the milk in double boiler with vanilla bean ; 
pour it over the beaten eggs and sugar; add salt. 
Return to the fire and let thicken; dissolve the gel- 
atine in a very little water and add to the cooled 
custard. Stir until it begins to congeal and fold in 
the whipped cream with a wire whip ; put in mold and 
set on ice. This cream is much better made the day 
before it is needed. It should be light and spongy. 

MERINGUES. 

4 eggs (whites) ; % teaspoonful of lemon 

yi teaspoonful of vanilla; extract; 

1 cup of powdered sugar. 

Add a tiny pinch of salt to the eggs and beat them 
until very stiff; sprinkle the sugar over the stiffly- 
beaten eggs, and continue beating until the mixture 
will hold its shape when dropped from the spoon. 
Flavor. Drop from a large kitchen-spoon upon 
heavy writing-paper on inverted biscuit tins; make in 
oblong form and sprinkle with sugar. Put into a 
very slow oven, and for the first thirty minutes allow 
the door to remain open. Bake about one hour and 
a half, allowing the meringue to just turn color; if 



DESSERTS. 



97 



inclined to stick moisten the paper and this will 
loosen the meringue. Scoop out the middle of each 
meringue and return to the oven upside down to dry 
out. This quantity will make four shells. 

ORANGE CHARLOTTE. 

Y box of gelatine (Cox) ; Yz cup of cold water ; 

Y cup of boiling water ; 1 cup of sugar ; 

3 tablespoonfuls lemon 1 cup of orange juice and 

juice; pulp; 
Whites of 3 eggs; 2 cups of whipped cream. 

Soak the gelatine in the cold water and add the 
boiling water; strain and add the sugar; then lemon 
juice, orange pulp, and juice. Place in a pan of ice 
water; when it begins to thicken beat with a whisk 
until frothy and add the well-beaten whites and the 
whipped cream. Set on ice to harden. — Mrs. W. A. 
Johnson, Paris, Ky. 

CUP CUSTARD. 

1 quart of rich cream ; 8 eggs (yolks) ; 

1 vanilla bean; Y lb- of granulated sugar. 

Break the vanilla bean in pieces and add to 
cream; put into double boiler. Beat the yolks and 
add sugar. Pour the scalded cream over the egg 
mixture, straining out the vanilla bean. Let cool. 
Fill little custard-cups; set them in a pan of cold 
water. When the water boils the custards will be 
quite thick; put away over night, if convenient, and 
they will be very creamy and smooth. Before serv- 
ing sprinkle with granulated sugar and a little pow- 
dered cinnamon. — J. H. C. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 

Y box of Cox gelatine; 2 oz. of Baker's chocolate; 
1 quart of rich milk; Sugar. 

Soak the gelatine in the quart of milk; grate the 
chocolate into the milk and make very sweet. Put 
into double boiler and boil for twenty minutes, stir- 



98 



DESSERTS. 



ring all the time; pour into a mold and set away to 
congeal. Eat with sweetened cream flavored with a 
little vanilla. 

COFFEE PARFAIT. 

Yolks of 5 eggs ; 1 pint of whipped cream ; 

4 tablespoonfuls of black 3 tablespoonfuls of sugar 
coffee ; syrup . 

Turn into a pan the eggs; beat until very light; 
add the sugar syrup and black coffee. Stir this mix- 
ture over a slow fire until it is thick like custard. 
Take from the fire and beat it until light and cold. 
Fold in the whipped cream and pack in ice and salt 
for two hours. Serve in glasses with a tiny portion 
of whipped cream on top. 

WINE JELLY. 

2 ounces of gelatine (Cox) ; 2 pints of hot water ; 
6 lemons; ^ lb. of cut-loaf sugar; 

Rinds of 2 lemons (grated) ; 1 pint of brandy; 
2 pints of sherry; Handful of raisins; 

Whites of 4 eggs; Handful of cinnamon 

Shells of 4 eggs; bark. 

Pour one pint of hot water over the gelatine and 
let dissolve ten minutes; squeeze the lemon juice 
over the sugar and add the grated rind. Add one more 
pint of hot water to gelatine; pour all together, throw 
in cinnamon and raisins; add brandy and sherry wine. 
Beat the eggs and crush the shells and add to mixture. 
Place over a brisk fire and boil until a clear spot ap- 
pears in the center. Do not stir, but avoid allowing 
it to stick to bottom of kettle. Set off the fire for a 
few minutes; drip through flannel bag twice. 

PRUNE SOUFFLE. 

4 eggs (whites); 15 prunes; 

x /2 cup of pecans; ^2 cup of pulverized sugar. 

Boil prunes in sugar-water. Beat the whites until 
very light; add sugar, then prunes cut in small pieces, 
then pecans finely chopped. Continue beating all the 



DESSERTS. 



99 



time. Turn into a deep, ungreased pan and bake 
in a slow oven. Serve hot with sweetened whipped 
cream. 

SUET PUDDING. 



5 large sour apples; 

Handful of raisins; 

lyi cupfuls of bread 

crumbs ; 
1 cup of granulated sugar; 
yi lb. of beef suet; 

1 wineglassful of brandy; 

2 wineglasses of sherry 

wine; 



2 eggs; 

1 tablespoonful of allspice, 
cinnamon, and cloves, 
mixed ; 

A tiny bit of lemon peel; 

yi cup of molasses; 

1 dessertspoonful of soda; 
cup of buttermilk; 

Pinch of salt. 



Chop the apples and suet very fine; moisten the 
bread crumbs with the wine ; beat the sugar with the 
eggs. Divide the soda and add half to the molasses 
and the other half to the buttermilk. Put all ingre- 
dients together; add spices and wine. Turn into a 
buttered pudding mold and steam four hours. Serve 
with a hard sauce as a "Christmas pudding." 



CHRISTMAS PUDDING. 



1 lb. of raisins; 

yi lb. of almonds; 

1 lb. of bread crumbs; 

yi lb. of brown sugar; 

4 wineglassfuls of sherry; 

1 tablespoonful of cinna- 
mon, cloves, and 
lemon peel, mixed; 



1 lb. of currants; 

]/ 2 lb. of imported citron; 

8 eggs; 

1 lb. of beef suet; 

2 wineglassfuls of brandy; 
1 teaspoonful of salt; 

1 nutmeg (grated) ; 
yi pint of milk. 



Wash the raisins and currants and let dry out over 
night on top of stove in warmer. Cut citron in very 
small pieces; chop beef suet fine; blanch and chop 
the almonds; flour all fruit. Beat the eggs together 
until very light; add bread crumbs, milk, and spices, 
fruit and nuts. Mix thoroughly. Put in a greased 
mold or tie up in floured bags and steam five hours. 



100 



DESSERTS. 



If in bags, do not let them touch the water, but hang 
over the boiling water on a pole and keep closely 
covered. — J. H. C. 



DATE PUDDING. 



1 cup of dates; 
y± cup of sugar; 
3 eggs; 

Dash of vanilla ; 



1 cup of English walnuts; 
1 tablespoonful of flour; 
1 teaspoonful of baking 
powder. 



Break the dates into small pieces, after removing 
the seeds; break up the walnut meats. Beat the yolks 
and add sugar. Add the baking powder to the flour 
and sift over the dates and walnuts. Put all together 
and flavor with vanilla. Add the whites beaten to a 
stiff froth last. Put in buttered pan and bake slowly 
for forty minutes. 



FRUIT PUDDING. 



1 egg; 

T /2 cup of buttermilk; 

1 cup of raisin currants 

and citron, mixed; 
1 teaspoonful of soda; 



^ teaspoonful of cloves ; 
1 cup of sugar; 
^2 cup of molasses; 
1 teaspoonful each of cin- 
namon and allspice. 



Beat the sugar with the egg; put half of the soda 
into the buttermilk and half into the molasses; stir 
into the beaten eggs and sugar; add spices and fruit 
(floured a little). Steam three hours in a buttered 
mold and serve with egg-sauce. 



SAUCE FOR A SWEET PUDDING. 

1 egg yolk; 1 tablespoonful of pow- 

1 glass of sherry wine; dered sugar; 

1 cupful of whipped cream. 

Beat the egg and sugar until light; add the sherry 
wine and, just before serving, turn in the whipped 
cream. 



DESSERTS. 



101 



CHOCOLATE SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM. 

cupful of butter; 2 cupfuls of powdered 

% cupful of cream; sugar; 
x /2 cake of Baker's choc- ^2 cupful of sherry wine, 
olate ; 

Cream the butter and sugar; add the melted 
chocolate after they are hot in double boiler, then 
the cream ; wine last. Half of this quantity is enough 
for six people. 

PLAIN SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 

1 cupful of dark-brown 1 cupful of granulated 
sugar ; sugar ; 

1 teaspoonful of flour; 1 tablespoonful of butter; 
cupful of boiling water; >^ cup of cream. 

Mix the flour with the sugar; add the butter 
and boiling water. Let boil up well and slowly turn 
in the cream. Flavor with vanilla, or nutmeg, or 
sherry, or whisky. 

EGG SAUCE. 

Dissolve one teaspoonful of flour in a very little 
cold water; add it to one cupful of boiling water 
and a piece of butter the size of an egg. Boil this 
to the consistency of thick cream and keep it hot. 
Beat one egg (white and yolk together) ; add one 
cupful of granulated sugar. Beat until light and 
creamy; flavor with vanilla. When ready for use, 
pour the hot mixture over the egg and sugar, beat 
up and serve at once. 

EGGNOG SAUCE FOR FROZEN PUDDING. 

2 eggs (beaten separately) ; 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar; 
% cupful of whisky; y 2 pint of cream; 

1 teaspoonful of Jamaica 1 teaspoonful of brandy, 
rum; 

Beat the yolks for ten minutes; add the sugar 
and beat ten minutes longer. Pour the whisky over 
8 



102 



DESSERTS. 



the eggs and sugar; add 
the cream and let it drain, 
fold in the beaten whites, 
to serve. 



rum and brandy. Beat 
Add to egg mixture and 
Keep on ice until ready 



DESSERTS. 103 



104 DESSERTS. 



Cake. 



Two things are essential to good cake-making — the 
measures accurate and the heat of the oven right. 
The success of all cake depends largely upon the heat 
of the oven. For a thick cake a very slow oven is 
needed; for a thin layer cake more heat is required. 

Do not stir cake; beat it, lifting the batter from 
the bottom of the bowl at every stroke. 

Cream the butter; never melt it. Add a tiny pinch 
of salt to all cake. If, in baking, the cake rises un- 
evenly the oven is too hot. If it falls in the middle 
and is spongy and crumbles, not enough flour was used. 
If it cracks open in rising too much flour has been 
used. Add flour last to cake; beating it injures it. 

Grease all tins with lard. Dredge all fruit with 
flour. If cake tins have a tendency to stick, warm 
them on top of range and rub well with salt. 

Have everything in readiness before beginning to 
mix cake, and get it into the oven as quickly as 
possible. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

1 lb. of flour; 1 lb. of raisins; 

1 lb. of sugar; 1 lb. of almonds; 

1 lb. of currants; % pint of whisky; 

lb. of imported citron ; ]/2 pint of molasses ; 

1 teaspoonful of allspice; 1 tablespoonful of nutmeg; 

1 tablespoonful of cloves; 1 tablespoonful of cinna- 
1 tablespoonful of soda; mon; 
1 dozen eggs (leaving out six whites) ; 1 lb. butter. 

Cream the butter and sugar; add the molasses, 
then eggs, which have been beaten separately; next 
the flour, which has been slightly browned; then the 
soda. Add the spices, which have been dissolved in 
the whisky. Dredge the fruit with flour and add to 
the batter last. Bake in a very slow oven for three 
and a half hours. 

105 



106 



CAKE. 



SPONGE CAKE. 

6 eggs; 1 cup of sugar (powdered) ; 

1 cup of flour; Pinch of salt; 

2 teaspoonfuls of lemon juice. 

Beat the yolks until light; add sugar and continue 
beating; add lemon juice. To the whites of the 
eggs add the salt and beat until stiff. Fold into the 
egg mixture (do not beat), and bake in a well-greased 
pan one and a quarter hours. 



JELLY CAKE. 

]/ 2 lb. of butter; 2 rounding teaspoonfuls of 
6 eggs; baking powder; 

2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla; 1 cup of milk; 

lb. of sugar; 1 lb. of flour. 

Cream the butter and sugar; add milk slowly, 
beating hard. Beat in the yolks until light. Add the 
flour, baking powder, and vanilla. Fold in the stiffly 
beaten whites last. Pour into cake tins and bake. 
Put together with plum jelly and sprinkle top layer 
with powdered sugar. 

WHITE CAKE, No. 1. 

1 cup of butter; 1 cup of milk; 

Z}4 cups of flour; 2 teaspoonfuls of baking 

8 eggs (whites) ; powder ; 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla; 1 tablespoonful of whisky. 

2 cups of sugar; 

Cream the butter and add the sugar; beat until 
light. Add the milk slowly, then flour. Into the last 
of the flour sift the baking powder. Flavor with the 
vanilla and whisky and fold in the well-beaten 
whites last. Bake one hour in a deep biscuit pan in 
a slow oven. When quite cold, cut in half, making 
two deep layers ; put together with icing. 



CAKE. 



107 



WHITE CAKE, No. 2. 

1 cup of butter; 2 scant cups of sugar; 
3 cups of flour; 12 eggs (whites). 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking 

powder ; 

Bake in biscuit pan or cake tins, and put together 
with icing. Flavor to taste. 

WHITE CAKE, No. 3. 

12 eggs (whites); 1 cup of cornstarch; 

3 cups of sugar (powdered) ; 1 cup of butter; 

2 teaspoonfuls of cream 1 cup of milk ; 

of tartar; 3 cups of flour; 

1 teaspoonful of soda. 
Sift the cream of tartar with the flour; add one- 
half of the milk to the cornstarch and dissolve the 
soda in the other half. Cream the butter and add 
sugar, a little flour, then a little of cornstarch and 
milk; the beaten whites and remaining flour, soda, 
and milk. Flavor with one-half of a teaspoonful of 
vanilla and a few drops of lemon extract. This is a 
most delicious cake. 

DEVIL'S FOOD, No. 1. 

% cup of butter; >2 cup of sweet milk; 

1 cup of brown sugar; 2^ cups of flour; 

3 eggs (yolks only) ; 1 teaspoonful of soda. 

Cream the sugar and butter; add the milk, flour, 
soda, and eggs; beat well, and just before pouring 
into pan, add the chocolate filling. 

Filling. 

1 cup of grated chocolate; 1 cup of brown sugar; 
cup of sweet milk. 

Put in double boiler and stir until dissolved, but 
do not boil. Beat the filling into the cake batter and 
bake slowly. Put together with plenty of white 
icing. 



108 



CAKE. 



DEVIL'S FOOD, No. 2. 

>2 cup of butter; 2 cups of dark brown 

2 eggs; sugar; 

2% cups of flour; cup of buttermilk. 

Cream the butter, add sugar and beaten yolks, 
then buttermilk. Mix one-third of a cake of Baker's 
chocolate with one-half of a cup of boiling water in 
which one teaspoonful of soda has been dissolved. 
Pour this mixture into the cake batter, add the flour 
and beaten whites. Put together with filling given 
below: 

2 cups of "coffee C" 1 tablespoonful of butter; 
sugar ; ^ cup of cream or milk. 

Boil as any icing and spread on cake. 



WHITE LOAF CAKE. 

\% cups of sugar; ^4 cup of butter; 

^ cup of milk; lyi cups of flour; 

teaspoonful of soda; 8 eggs (whites) ; 

1 teaspoonful of cream of tartar. 

Cream the butter and sugar together; add the 
milk. Sift the soda with the flour several times. 
Beat the eggs a little and add to them the cream of 
tartar, then beat until very stiff; flavor; bake one 
and a half hours. Put the cake into almost a cold 
oven and gradually increase the heat for baking. 
Flavor to taste. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

6 eggs; 1 large tablespoonful of 

2 cups of flour; butter; 

% cup of milk; 2 teaspoonfuls of cream of 

1 teaspoonful of soda; tartar; 

2 cups of sugar; 1 orange. 

Divide the eggs and beat them separately. Cream 
the butter with one cup of the sugar; squeeze the 
orange juice over the other cup of sugar and add to 



CAKE. 



109 



the butter and sugar; then the yolks of the eggs, the 
milk in which has been dissolved the soda, flour in 
which has been dissolved the cream of tartar, and last 
the beaten whites. Bake in jelly pans and put 
together with filling ; on top a thick layer of powdered 
sugar. 

Filling. 

\yi lbs. of powdered Juice of one orange and 

sugar; one lemon; 

2 eggs (whites). 



WALNUT CUP CAKES. 

1 egg; 2 cups of flour; 

Yi cup of butter; 2 level teaspoonfuls of 

1 cup of walnut meats; baking powder; 

1 cup of milk; 1 tablespoonful of brandy; 

1 cup of sugar. 

Cream the butter; add sugar and beaten egg; then 
the milk and flour mixed with the baking powder. 
Mix in the walnuts and brandy. Bake in muffin pans 
in a slow oven. — Springfield. 



FRUIT COOKIES. 



1 y& cups of sugar ; 
3 eggs; 

teaspoonful of salt; 
1 cup of milk; • 
1 teaspoonful of cinna- 
mon; 



1 cup of butter; 

lyi cups of flour; 

1 teaspoonful of soda dis- 
solved in a little hot 
water ; 

% cup of currants ; 



% cup of raisins. 

Cream the butter and sugar; add the beaten eggs, 
a little of the flour, then milk, more flour, spice, and 
sift the salt with the last part of the flour. Reserve 
one-quarter of a cup of flour for the dredging of the 
currants and raisins; chop them; add to cake batter; 
stir in the soda, and drop from a spoon onto a greased 
paper, and bake in a moderate oven. 



110 



CAKE. 



PECAN COOKIES. 



\yi cups of brown sugar; 

1 egg; 

2 cups of chopped pecans ; 
1 large teaspoonful of 

baking powder; 



2 cups of flour; 

1 cup of butter; 

2 tablespoonfuls of milk; 
1 cup of rolled oats; 
Pinch of salt. 



Cream butter; add sugar; add egg, then milk. In 
the flour mix the baking powder. Put all together 
and beat hard; add pecans, rolled oats, salt, and 
flavoring. Drop from a teaspoon on greased paper 
and bake in a moderate oven. Flavor with vanilla. 



SOFT GINGER COOKIES. 

1 cup of molasses; yi cup of butter; 

1 tablespoonful of ginger; 2 tablespoonfuls of warm 

% teaspoonful of soda; water; 

Flour enough to roll out. 

Cream the butter; add molasses, then soda dis- 
solved in the warm water, flour and ginger. Beat 
well, turn on biscuit board, roll out and cut. Bake in 
a quick oven. 

CUP CAKE. 



1 cup of butter; 
3^2 cups of flour; 

2 heaping teaspoonfuls 

of baking powder; 



3 eggs ; 

2 cups of sugar; 

1 cup of cold water; 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 



Cream the butter and sugar; add the flour and 
cold water alternately; then the eggs beaten together; 
then flour in which the baking powder is mixed, and 
vanilla. Bake in well-greased muffin rings, in a 
moderate oven. 



BRITTLE GINGER SNAPS. 

1 lb. of butter; 1 lb. of brown sugar; 

1 small pint of molasses; 2% lbs. of flour; 

1 ounce of ginger. 



CAKE. 



Ill 



Cream the butter and sugar together; add the 
molasses, ginger and flour. Roll out as thin as pos- 
sible and bake in a quick oven. It will require pa- 
tience to roll and cut these cakes, but they are worth 
the trouble. Cut in fancy shapes, and lift from the 
board with a cake lifter. 



PECAN CAKE. 

5}4 ounces of butter; 6 eggs; 

1 lb. of sugar; 1 lb. of flour; 

1 tablespoonful of baking 2 lbs. of raisins (seeded) ; 

powder; y£ lb. of hulled pecans; 

}4 lb. of shelled almonds; 1 wineglassful of whisky; 
1 wineglassful of sweet cream. 

Cream the butter and sugar together; add the 
cream; mix the baking powder with the flour, reserv- 
ing enough to dredge the fruit with. Chop the al- 
monds and pecans (not too fine); add to mixture. 
Turn in whisky, floured raisins and eggs (beaten 
separately). Put in greased mold and steam three 
hours. Remove top and set in oven to dry out. — 
Bourbon Co. 

COCOANUT DROPS. 

1 egg (white); }4 lb. of cocoanut; 

}i lb. of powdered sugar; 1 teaspoonful of flour. 

Mix the flour with the sugar, and gradually add 
it to the well-beaten white of the egg. Flavor with a 
few drops of vanilla and drop from a teaspoon on 
buttered paper and bake until slightly browned. 



GINGER CAKE. 



1 cup of butter; 
1 cup of molasses; 
3 cups of flour; 
1 teaspoonful of soda 
1 cup of sweet milk; 



1 cup of sugar; 
3 eggs; 

1 tablespoonful of ginger; 
1 tablespoonful of allspice 
and cinnamon mixed; 



Wineglassful of brandy. 



112 



CAKE. 



Beat the eggs separately; cream the butter and 
sugar together; add the molasses and beaten yolks, 
flour, soda, spices, milk, and brandy. Fold in the 
beaten whites. Bake in a very slow oven and let 
come up evenly. 

GINGER BREAD. 



1 cup of dark New Or- 
leans molasses; 

1 cup of "coffee C" 
sugar ; 

1 cup of boiling water; 

1 quart of flour; 



y 2 cup of lard ; 
1 teaspoonful of soda; 
\j4 teaspoonfuls of ginger; 
1 teaspoonful of allspice; 
1 teaspoonful of cinna- 
mon. 



Beat the lard; add sugar and blend together; add 
molasses and a little of the flour, then spices; dissolve 
the soda in the boiling water and add to mixture. 
Beat in remaining flour and bake slowly. 

BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE, No. 1. 

6 eggs; 1 cup of raisins; 

2 cups of jam; 1 cup of butter; 

}4 cup of whisky; 2 cups of sugar; 

1 teaspoonful cloves and 3 cups of flour; 

cinnamon mixed; 1 cup of buttermilk; 
1 teaspoonful of soda. 

Cream the butter and sugar together; add the 
jam and eggs (beaten separately), the soda dissolved 
in the buttermilk, the whisky, raisins, and flour. 
Add the spices and bake very slowly in a very mod- 
erate oven. 

BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE, No. 2. 

1 cup of butter ; 1 teaspoonful of cloves ; 

8 eggs (yolks) ; 1 teaspoonful of nut- 

2 cups of jam; meg; 

1 teaspoonful of allspice; 2 cups of sugar; 
1 teaspoonful of cinna- 5 cups of sifted flour; 
mon; 1 cup of buttermilk; 

2 even teaspoonfuls of soda. 



CAKE. 



113 



Cream the butter and sugar; add the jam, then 
the eggs (well beaten) ; add the spices and the soda 
dissolved in the milk; lastly the flour. Put together 
with white icing or a chocolate icing made as follows: 

Icing. 

2 cups of granulated 1 tablespoonful of butter; 

sugar; 1 cup of brown sugar; 

$i cup of grated y^. teaspoonful of vanilla 

chocolate ; (scant) ; 

1 cup of rich cream. 

Boil until soft when dropped in water; beat and 
let thicken; put on cake. 

PLAIN POUND CAKE. 

j4 lb. of butter; 1 scant teaspoonful of va- 

$4 R>« of sugar; nilla; 

1 tablespoonful of ^ lb. of flour; 

whisky; 1 rounding teaspoonful of 

5 eggs; baking powder; 

}4 cup of milk. 

Beat the eggs together until light. Cream the 
butter and sugar; add the milk and flour; beat thor- 
oughly. Add the eggs last and the baking powder 
mixed with a little of the flour; flavor. Bake in an 
old-fashioned pound cake pan in a very slow oven 
for one hour. Let stand in the pan for fifteen min- 
utes before turning out. 

QUAKER OAT CAKES. 

cups of Quaker oats; 1 cup of granulated 
Pinch of salt; sugar; 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking 2 eggs; 

powder; 1 tablespoonful of butter; 

2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla. 

Mix the Quaker oats, sugar, salt and baking pow- 
der dry like pie-crust. Cream the butter and add all 
together. Stir well and drop from a teaspoon into 



114 



CAKE. 



greased pans far apart, as they will spread. Bake in a 
slow oven and watch carefully, as the}' are easily 
burned. Take from the pan with a cake-lifter while 
hot; they become brittle and can not be lifted when 
cold. 

DOUGHNUTS, No. 1. 

4 eggs ; 1 cup of butter ; 

2 heaping teaspoonfuls of 2 cups of sugar; 

baking powder; Flour enough to roll out; 

1 cup of sweet milk. 

Cream the butter and sugar, add the eggs, beaten 
separately; the milk, and flour mixed with the baking 
powder. Fry in deep fat and roll in cinnamon and 
sugar. 

DOUGHNUTS, No. 2. 

3 eggs; 2 cups of sugar; 

1 cup of sour milk ; 1 teaspoonful of soda; 

1 tablespoonful of butter; Flour enough to roll out. 

Fry in deep fat, and sprinkle with plenty of 
powdered sugar. 

CRULLERS. 

3 eggs; 5 tablespoonfuls of melt- 

1 cup of sweet milk ; ed lard ; 

Big pinch of salt; 2 teaspoonfuls of baking 

1>? cups of sugar; powder; 

Flour enough to roll out. 

Use vanilla or nutmeg for flavoring. I use nut- 
meg. Fry in hot lard ; sprinkle with sugar. 

HARD COOKIES. 

1 cup of butter; Flour enough to make a 

2 eggs : soft dough ; 

2 cups of sugar. 

Roll out. sprinkle with sugar and nutmeg; fold 
and roll again, sprinkling with sugar and nutmeg. 
To bake, roll out very thin, sprinkle sugar and nut- 
meg on top and bake in a quick oven. To keep crisp, 
put in tin box. 



CAKE. 115 



116 CAKE. 



Filling for Cakes. 



FONDANT ICING. 

3 cups of granulated sugar ; ^ of a saltspoonful of 
\y 2 cups of cold water; cream of tartar. 

Mix cream of tartar with sugar; add water 
and boil until a soft ball will form when dropped in 
water. Do not stir it after it begins to boil. Take 
from the fire and let it cool a little; then flavor and 
beat until white. In icing small cakes, set some of the 
fondant in a little boiling water and stir until melted ; 
then dip cakes with a fork. 

CARAMEL ICING, No. 1. 

2 cups of dark brown 1 tablespoonful of butter; 
sugar; 1 cup of granulated 

1 cup of rich cream; sugar. 

A tiny pinch of soda into the cream; boil as choc- 
olate icing, and beat until thick. 

CARAMEL ICING, No. 2. 

2 cups of granulated sugar ; 1 teaspoonful of vanilla; 
y$ of a cup of maple syrup ; 1 tablespoonful of butter ; 

1 cup of cream. 

Put sugar, syrup, and cream on; when it boils, 
add the butter. Boil until it will form a soft ball in 
cold water and beat when cool until thick. 

MARSHMALLOW ICING. 

Into a double boiler put one-quarter of a pound of 
fresh marshmallows and three tablespoonfuls of hot 
water. Let stand until melted on back of range and 
beat into white icing. Spread on cake at once. 
9 117 



118 FILLING FOR CAKES. 



WHITE ICING. 

1 level saltspoonful of % cup of cold water; 
cream of tartar ; 2 eggs (whites) ; 

2 cups of granulated sugar. 
Stir the sugar and water until it begins to boil; 
then do not touch it, as it will grain. Add the cream 
of tartar to the sugar before pouring in the water. 
Boil it until it hairs from spoon, and beat into the 
stiffly-beaten whites. 

CHOCOLATE ICING, No. 1. 

cake of Baker's choc- 1 pint of light brown 
olate ; sugar ; 

1 tablespoonful of butter; 1 cup of milk; 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Break the chocolate in pieces; add sugar, butter, 
and milk; boil until it will form a soft ball when 
dropped in water. Take from the fire, let it cool and 
add vanilla. Beat until thick and spread on cake. 

CHOCOLATE ICING, No. 2. 

3 cups of granulated sugar ; 1 teaspoonful of vanilla ; 
% cake of Baker's choco- 1 cup of sweet cream ; 
late; 1 tablespoonful of butter. 

Put together as in above recipe, and let cool be- 
fore beating it. 

PRAULINE ICING. 

Make a plain caramel and when done, add one 
cup of broken pecan kernels and pour over cake. — 
"The Blue Ribbon Cook Book." 

LEMON JELLY FILLING. 

1 cup of sugar; cup of butter; 

3 eggs (yolks) ; 1 large lemon, juice and 

1 cup of boiling water ; grated rind ; 

1 tablespoonful of flour. 
Cream the butter and sugar, then yolks beaten 
light, lemon juice and flour. Stir in the boiling water. 
Cook in double boiler until thick and smooth. 



FILLING FOR CAKES. 



120 FILLING FOR CAKES. 



Creams and Ices. 



In preparing ice cream mixtures it is more eco- 
nomical and just as delicious to make a foundation of 
milk. Scald all milk in double boiler; that is, put it 
on in cold water and when the water in outside kettle 
boils the milk is scalded. Chop the ice very fine; the 
finer it is, the more rapidly the mixture will freeze. 
Use about one part salt to three of ice, and let the 
cream stand five minutes packed down before be- 
ginning to freeze. Turn the crank very rapidly at 
first, as this makes it very smooth. When it begins 
to freeze continue to turn with a slower movement. 
It will take from twenty to twenty-five minutes to 
freeze properly. To be good, all ices must be made 
with sugar-syrup. Boil the water and sugar ten min- 
utes, then add other ingredients. A cup of sour cream, 
with a pinch of baking soda in it will greatly improve 
any frozen mixture. It will make it very light. 

VANILLA ICE CREAM, No. 1. 

1 pint of milk; \}4 cups of sugar; 

1 tablespoonful of flour; Scant teaspoonful of va- 

1 quart of cream ; nilla. 

With a little of the cold milk rub smooth the flour, 
and add to milk in double boiler; stir and let thicken. 
Remove from fire and cool. Add the sugar to cream 
and flavor. Turn all into the freezer and freeze. 

VANILLA ICE CREAM, No. 2. 

1 pint of milk; 1 egg; 

1 rounding teaspoonful of 1% cups of sugar; 

flour; \}4 pints of rich cream; 

}4 teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Scald the milk in double boiler; beat the egg just 
enough to blend it. With one-half cup of the sugar 
mix the flour and beat it into the blended egg. Pour 

121 



122 



CREAMS AND ICES. 



the scalded milk over the egg mixture and return it 
to the fire. Stir constantly until smooth and thick- 
ened, but do not let it boil. Set away until cool and 
flavor. This is called the foundation. Sweeten the 
cream with the remaining three-fourths of a cup of 
sugar, add to the foundation and turn into the 
freezer. 

PEACH ICE CREAM. 

1 pint of rich cream ; 1 quart of sliced peaches ; 

\}4 cups of sugar. 

Make a foundation as in Vanilla Ice Cream, No. 1. 
Sweeten the sliced peaches with one cup of the sugar 
and mash through a fine sieve; add the half cup of 
sugar to the cream. Mix the cream with the founda- 
tion and turn into the freezer. When the mixture 
begins to set, add the peaches. 

Strawberry cream is made in the same way, using 
same proportions. 

FROZEN CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 

Yolks of 4 eggs; \}4 cups of sugar; 

3 cups of milk; y£ cake of Baker's choc- 

1 quart of cream; olate; 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 

Put the chocolate (broken in small pieces) with 
the milk in double boiler; stir until thoroughly 
melted. Beat the eggs and sugar together and pour 
into the hot mixture. Continue to stir until smooth 
and thick. Let cool, and just before freezing add the 
cream and vanilla. 

FROZEN CUSTARD. 

1 pint of milk; 1 pint of cream; 

1 level teaspoonful of flour; Yolks of 3 eggs; 
1 large cup of sugar; }4 of a vanilla bean. 

Scald the milk in double boiler with the vanilla 
bean. Beat the yolks a very little and add the flour, 



CREAMS AND ICES. 



123 



mixed with half of the sugar. Strain the scalded 
milk over the egg mixture and return to double 
boiler; stir until smooth and thick. Set away to 
cool; then to the cream add the other half of sugar 
and pour into the cooled custard. Freeze. 

MACAROON CREAM. 

1 pint of rich milk; 1 cup of sugar; 

1 egg; 12 macaroons (rolled 

3 tablespoonfuls of Ja- fine) ; 

maica rum; teaspoonful of va- 

1 pint of cream ; nilla ; 

1 teaspoonful of flour. 

Make a foundation of the pint of milk, one egg, 
half a cup of sugar, and flour. Sweeten the cream 
with the other half cup of sugar. Add the rolled mac- 
aroons and flavor. Stir into the foundation and turn 
into freezer. When frozen, add the Jamaica rum and 
give several turns to the freezer to mix well. 



FROZEN RICE PUDDING. 

]4. cup of rice; 1 pint of milk; 

y& teaspoonful of vanilla; 1 pint of cream; 

1 scant cup of sugar. 

Wash the rice well to free it from its floury coating, 
and put in double boiler with the milk and a good 
pinch of salt. Cook thoroughly. Let cool, sweeten, 
and flavor. At freezing time add the cream. Do 
not use too much salt in packing away. It must 
not be too firm. Serve with any crushed fruit in 
season (well sugared), or any preserve. 



LALLA ROOKH. 

1 pint of milk; 1 cup of sugar; 

Yolks of 4 eggs ; 1 pint of cream ; 

1 small cup of Jamaica 1 teaspoonful of vanilla, 
rum; 



124 



CREAMS AND ICES. 



Scald the milk in double boiler. Beat the yolks 
a little and add to sugar. Pour the scalded milk 
slowly over the egg mixture; return to double boiler 
and stir constantly until it forms a coating on the 
spoon, but do not let it boil. Set away to cool. When 
ready to freeze, add the cream and vanilla. When 
frozen add the rum, and turn for five minutes. Pack 
down in ice with plenty of salt for two hours. Serve 
as you would punch. 

FROZEN PUDDING. 

pint of milk; 1 cup of sugar; 

1 egg; 1 teaspoonful of gela- 

2 tablespoonfuls of rum; tine; 

1 level tablespoonful of 1 pint of cream; 

flour; ]/ 2 lb. of French fruit. 

Put the gelatine to soak in enough water to cover 
it. Put milk in double boiler to scald. Beat the egg 
and half of the sugar mixed with the flour together. 
Pour the scalded milk over the egg mixture. Return 
to the double boiler and stir constantly until thickened 
and very smooth. Take from the fire and add the 
gelatine; set away to cool. When cold add the cream 
and remaining sugar (dissolved in the cream) and the 
rum. Strain into the freezer, and when nearly frozen 
add the fruit cut in very small pieces. 

FRENCH STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM. 

1 pint of milk ; 1 pint of cream ; 

1 cup of strawberry pre- 1 scant cup of sugar ; 
serves; 2 eggs; 

2 tablespoonfuls of rum. 

Scald the milk; pour it over the beaten eggs and 
sugar. Return to double boiler and stir until smooth 
and thickened. Set away to cool. Add the cream 
and flavoring and turn into freezer. When frozen 
add the rum and strawberry preserves, and turn for 
a minute to mix well. 



CREAMS AND ICES. 125 



ORANGE ICE. 

Boil three-quarters of a pound of granulated sugar 
in one quart of water for ten minutes; strain and add 
the juice of six oranges and one lemon to the cooled 
syrup. Soak one tablespoonful of Cooper's gelatine 
in a tiny bit of cold water, and add one tablespoonful 
of boiling water to dissolve it. Strain it into the 
mixture and freeze. 



PINEAPPLE ICE. 

4 oranges; 1 tablespoonful of Coop- 

1 small can of grated er's gelatine; 

pineapple; 1^ cups of granulated 

4 lemons; sugar. 

Cover sugar with water and let boil ten minutes. 
Dissolve gelatine in a tiny bit of cold water; let 
stand a few minutes, and add one tablespoonful of 
boiling water. Squeeze the lemons and oranges, 
strain out all seeds, and add pineapple. Stir all to- 
gether and add enough water to fill a two-quart freezer. 

MAPLE GLACE. 

Yolks of six eggs; \}4 pints of cream 

y 2 cup of cream ; (whipped) ; 

1 cup of maple syrup. 

Beat the yolks and add to them the syrup, the 
half cup of cream, and cook the mixture in double 
boiler until it makes a coating on the spoon, stirring 
constantly. Turn into a bowl and beat until quite 
stiff. Fold in the whipped cream and pack in ice and 
salt for two hours. The success of glace depends upon 
the freezing of it. It must not be too hard. Experi- 
ence alone must be the guide. 



126 



CREAMS AXD ICES. 



MAPLE PARFAIT. 



Yolks of 5 eggs; 

1 pint of cream (whipped) ; 



Small cup of maple 
syrup. 



Beat the eggs until very light; add the maple 
syrup and put into double boiler. Stir constanth" 
until the mixture thickens. Turn into a cold bowl 
and. with a wire whip, beat it until it is light and 
creams*. Add the whipped cream to the maple 
mixture and pack in ice and salt for four hours. 



CREAMS AND ICES. 



CREAMS AND ICES. 



Reliable Recipes for Fruit. 



PRESERVING AND CANNING. 

When preserving, the fruit is thoroughly cooked, 
and three-quarters of a pound of sugar to one pound 
of fruit allowed. If very acid, one pound of sugar 
may be used. 

When canning, the fruit is well scalded and one- 
quarter of a pound of sugar to one pound of fruit 
allowed. 

Sterilize all jars and tops. Seal all fruit while 
scalding hot. 

In making jelly, use only the perfect fruit, if a 
very clear jelly is wanted. Never squeeze the jelly- 
bag. Strain the juice several times, and rinse out 
the bag in cold water between each straining. To 
each pint of juice allow one pound of sugar. Heating 
the sugar in the oven is a great saving of time. Make 
but one pint at a time; it will be clearer. Watch 
carefully the juice while boiling, and skim frequently. 

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES. 

Wash the fruit and cap the berries. To five 
pounds of fruit allow seven pounds of granulated 
sugar. Set on the back of range and bring slowly to 
boiling point. With the handle of a large kitchen- 
spoon keep the berries well stirred; this prevents 
breaking the fruit. Boil twenty minutes by the clock, 
and seal while hot. If made correctly, the berries 
will be whole in a delicious jelly. 

BRANDY PEACHES. 

Select large peaches, peel and keep them whole. 
Make a syrup of three-quarters of a pound of granu- 
lated sugar (to each pound of fruit), and one-quarter 

129 



130 RELIABLE RECIPES FOR FRUIT. 



of a pint of water. Drop the peaches into the boiling 
syrup and cook until very tender. Remove and pack 
in jars. Let the syrup continue to boil until very 
thick. To one pint of syrup add one pint of best 
brandy and seal. 

PRESERVED PEARS. 

Peel, core, and cut the pears in lengthwise pieces. 
Put to boil in enough water to cover the fruit. Let 
boil slowly until tender; drain well and measure fruit. 
To one pound of fruit allow one-half pound of gran- 
ulated sugar; to one peck of pears, one pound of 
candied ginger. Make a syrup and drop the pears 
into it. Add the ginger and boil until thick and clear. 

CHERRY CONSERVE. 

5 lbs. of ripe cherries, or 2 lbs. of seeded raisins; 
currants; 6 oranges; 

5 lbs. of granulated sugar. 

Seed the cherries (or stem the currants). Cut the 
raisins in tiny pieces; peel the oranges and put the 
rind on in cold water; let boil until tender, and cut in 
small bits. To the fruit add the juice of the oranges 
and sugar. Let heat until the sugar is melted, then 
add rind and raisins and boil until thick as jam. 
This conserve is delicious to serve with ice cream. 

GRAPE CONSERVE. 

3 lbs. of Concord grapes; 1 pint of water; 
2 pints of granulated 2 oranges ; 

sugar; lb. of almonds; 

y2 lb. of seeded raisins. 

Pulp the grapes and save the skins; put on pulps 
and bring to boiling point; then put through flour 
sifter (taking out seeds) ; add to this the skins, water, 
sugar, oranges (cut in very small pieces, seeds taken 
out, and peel cut in pieces, also), one-half pound seeded 
raisins. Boil thirty minutes, and just before taking 
off the fire add the almonds, cut in long strips. 



RELIABLE RECIPES FOR FRUIT. 131 



ORANGE MARMALADE, No. 1. 

6 oranges; 3 lemons. 

Peel oranges and lemons, taking off heavy white 
inside skin. Put peel and pulp through meat-grinder, 
taking out seeds. To one pint of mixture add one and 
a half pints of water; boil one-half hour. Let stand 
twenty-four hours; then add one and a half pints of 
sugar to each pint of mixture and boil one-half hour. 
Use thin-skin, tart oranges. 

ORANGE MARMALADE, No. 2. 

3 grape-fruit; 4 lemons; 

1 dozen acid oranges. 

Cut the fruit in quarters and remove all seed; 
then clip fine with scissors. To each pound of sliced 
fruit add one and one-half pints of cold water. Let 
stand twenty-four hours; then boil for three-quarters 
of an hour, or until clips are quite tender. Again let 
stand until next day. Weigh the mixture again. To 
every pound of fruit and juice allow one and one- 
quarter pounds of granulated sugar. Boil all to- 
gether for three-quarters of an hour. Before filling 
jars, let jelly cool a little, as clips will be more evenly 
distributed. 

GREEN GRAPE JELLY. 

Pull the grapes from the stems, rejecting all im- 
perfect ones. Put into a large granite pan or pot, 
with a very little water to start the juices. Watch 
carefully and stir often, to keep from sticking; let 
drip through a flannel bag, then through a bag made 
of cheese-cloth. Wash out the bag in cold water and 
let drip through a third time. To one pint of juice 
allow one pound of sugar. Boil the juice for twenty 
minutes; heat the sugar in the oven and add to juice. 
Boil up once, and be sure it looks clear. Pour into 
jelly-glasses; stand a silver spoon in the glass until 
filled; this will prevent the glass from cracking. 
A steel knitting-needle will answer the same purpose. 



132 RELIABLE RECIPES FOR FRUIT. 



CURRANT JELLY. 

Wash the fruit and heat it until the berries be- 
come well mashed. Put through a flannel jelly-bag 
twice. To each pint of juice allow one pound of sugar. 
Boil the juice five minutes; turn in the sugar, which 
has been heated in the oven, and boil one minute. 
Put in glasses, and when cold and jellied, cover with 
paraffin. This recipe will never fail if directions are 
followed. 

RED RASPBERRY AND CURRANT JELLY. 

Use two-thirds raspberries to one-third currants. 
To one pint of juice add one pound of sugar. Prepare 
juice as in general directions. Test by dropping a 
little into cold water. When it does not mingle with 
the water, it is done. 

APPLE JELLY. 

Use tart apples. Wash and cut in pieces. Re- 
move all imperfect spots, and do not core or peel 
them. Put them into a granite pan and just barely 
cover them with water. Simmer slowly until tender. 
Strain through a cheese-cloth bag. Wash out bag 
and strain again. To each pint of juice allow one 
pound of sugar. Boil the juice five minutes, add the 
sugar, and stir until it dissolves. It will take from 
twenty to twenty-five minutes. Test by dropping a 
little into a cold saucer; if done it will jelly imme- 
diately. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Wash one quart of cranberries, and add three- 
quarters of a pint of boiling water. Cover closely 
and boil five minutes over a brisk fire. Stir with a 
wooden spoon, and press through a colander; add 
three-quarters of a pint of sugar, return to the fire 
and simmer five minutes. Test by dropping a little 
into a cup of cold water. If it falls to the bottom 
and does not mingle with the water, it is done. 
Rinse glass or mold with cold water before pouring 
in the jelly. This will prevent sticking. 



RELIABLE RECIPES FOR FRUIT. 133 



10 



NOH 25 1911 

134 RELIABLE RECIPES FOR FRUIT. 



Table of Weights and Measures, 



4 gills = 1 pint. 

2 pints = 1 quart. 

4 quarts = 1 gallon. 

1 kitchen cupful = Y 2 pint. 

4 kitchen cupfuls = 1 quart. 

f £ U P f V ls of flo " r f fl [ = 1 pound. 

1 heaping quart ol flour ) 1 

5 tablespoonfuls sifted flour = 1 teacup. 

7 tablespoonfuls granulated sugar = 1 teacup. 

2 cupfuls of granulated sugar = 1 pound. 
2}4 cupfuls of powdered sugar = 1 pound. 

2 cupfuls of soft butter, well packed, = 1 pound. 
4 tablespoonfuls soft butter = 1 teacup. 
Butter size of an egg = }i cupful. 

LIQUIDS. 

2)4. teaspoonfuls of liquid = 1 tablespoonful. 

16 tablespoonfuls = 1 cupful, or pint. 

16 fluid ounces = 1 pint. 

4 cupfuls = 1 quart. 

1 wineglass = 4 tablespoonfuls. 

1 tumbler = yi pint, or 2 ounces. 

PROPORTIONS. 

Allow 1 even teaspoonful of baking powder to 1 cupful of flour. 

3 heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder to 1 quart of flour. 
1 even teaspoonful of soda to 1 pint of sour milk. 

1 even teaspoonful of soda to yi pint of molasses. 

6 eggs to 1 quart of milk for custards. 
3 eggs to 1 pint of milk for custards. 

1 scant teaspoonful of vanilla to 1 quart of milk for custards. 
DISSOLVING GELATINE. 

Gelatine should be soaked in cold water (allowing 1 cupful 
of water to a box of gelatine) for one or more hours, then a 
small portion of boiling water poured on. 

Allow \yi quarts of liquid to 2 ounces of gelatine, including 
water^needed for soaking. 



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